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Hi,

I came across the expression ''here's mud in your eyes', but I didn't understand how and when it's used. I checked the dictionary, but it didn't really clear things up for me. Could you please give me a few examples in which it is used?

Thank you in advance.

- DJB -
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Hi,
eg You pour two alcoholic drinks, for your friend and yourself. You each pick up your glass.
Before you both drink, you sometimes say something like
'Here's mud in your eye'
or
'Cheers'
or
'Good health'.

These expressions are called toasts. They mean very little.

Clive.
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Not in my experience; it is utterly innocuous and said without thought.



One on-line explanation: Here's mud in your eye is used as a toast. The speaker is really congratulating himself, for the saying comes from the world of horse racing where the winning horse will kick mud into the eyes of those following.


Another: [The] actual origin of this phrase is Biblical, when Jesus spat in the dirt and rubbed the wet dirt (mud) into they eye of a blind man, which healed the man's sight. "Here's a cure" sounds the most plausible given the circumstances under which it is most often used.

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Hi Clive,

Thanks. The reason I asked was that I read somewhere that this particular toast had a special meaning, or is said when the 'proposer' of the toast envies/is jealous of the person to whom he proposes the toast. Is that true?

Thanks!

- DJB -
 Mister Micawber's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Ah I see. Thank you.

So, just to be safe:

Here's mud in your eye! Cheers, Good health are all interchangeable?

I was afraid I was going to offend someone by saying Here's mud in your eye, but I guess that's not true.

Thanks Mr. M and Clive!

- DJB -
Yes, interchangeable, inoffensive, and all of about the same register.
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The] actual origin of this phrase is Biblical, when Jesus spat in the dirt and rubbed the wet dirt (mud) into they eye of a blind man, which healed the man's sight. "Here's a cure" sounds the most plausible given the circumstances under which it is most often used.

To me the biblical reference is more appropriate, kind of hoping Jesus puts mud in your eye, like a toast to good health. While true kicking of mud, by winning horse, as a means to pat ones self on the back, is self centered and bragging, why would a friend cheers himself calling you a second place horse?aka loser. Cheers are meant to be given, I would think it was bad manners to cheers yourself.
AnonymousI would think it was bad manners to cheers yourself.
When was it exactly, I wonder, when bad manners were completely eliminated from the face of the earth? Emotion: smile

That is, why must the more polite interpretation of a saying be the correct one? I don't see any logical connection. Emotion: thinking

CJ
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