Hey, don't call me an Asian!
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( Subject: Hey, don't call me an Asian!
( From: (Email Removed)
( Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2005
Hey, don't call me an Asian!
By Rashmee Z. Ahmed
Times News Network
Tuesday, January 11, 2005
LONDON - Goodness Gracious Me and kiss my chuddies, but just as the world was getting used to the omnibus term 'British Asian' and all its newly-cool, over-curried cultural connotations, Brown Britain is calling time on it and asking to be labelled Hindu, Sikh or Muslim instead.
Indians, who constitute more than half of the UK's 3.5 per cent 'British Asian' population, are leading the charge towards separate lives. Hindus are in the
forefront, Sikhs just behind them and Pakistani and Bangladeshi Muslims are being forced into a default acceptance that they can no longer shelter under the convenient cover-all term 'Asian'.
These are the conclusions of a much-hyped new BBC
programme 'Don't call me Asian' and its writer-presenter Sarfraz Manzoor told TOI , the three-year-old move towards separate labels may have huge implications for British government and society.
"No longer can we say the interests of Sikhs and Hindus are the same as those of all British Asians. The
government, will, at some point have to formulate more specific and targeted legislation, not just for all Asians but for specific strands within," he said.
Commentators agree that the overwhelmingly well-educated, prosperous and well-integrated Indian community's needs are deeply divergent from the comparatively provincial, poor, insular and failing Pakistani and Bangladeshi. Add to that a growing assertiveness by British Hindus and Sikhs and the term 'Asian' seems clearly inadequate.

Says British-born-and-bred London college student Neeta: "Asian is not a term I use for myself at home or with my friends. I don't feel Asian, I feel British and Indian and Hindu."
Manzoor and many others believe, the move towards clear labelling may be positive. "Till now, Britain's Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims were defined by others by what they were not – not white, not black," says Manzoor.
Now, they are choosing their own definitions.
Arguably, it all started after the British Pakistani rioting that set north-west Britain ablaze in the long, hot summer of 2001. British Indians were alternately intimidated and indignant about being linked with the unprovoked mob violence by uneducated, unemployed
Pakistani Muslim youths.
Says Manzoor, who spent several months making the BBC programme: "Many of the young Hindu women I spoke to said they saw no reason to be lumped with the rioters."

Race relations experts say the quest for separate public identities escalated after 9/11, when British Hindus further sought to put a safe distance between themselves and Muslims.
Earlier last year, the Indian High Commission here significantly began to speak in much the same language. Sections of the several-hundred thousand Sikh community, meanwhile, began a parallel attempt to be labelled 'Sikh' and not 'Indian'.
The ironic result, points out Manzoor, is that just as it has become increasingly cool to be British Asian with all the hip, world-beating music, food, fashion, films and television sitcoms, Asians themselves have moved away from racial to religious affiliation.
Manzoor said his conversations with women activists of Britain's largest Hindu youth group and parallel chats with young Pakistani Muslim men underlined the extent of the divide. "The young Hindu women were incredibly well- spoken. The Muslims were really rough. They didn't really have anything in common at all."
Except, of course, the colour brown. Till the UK's 2001 census, the demographics of Brown Britain were officially labelled 'Asian', with the add-on explanation that it was a reference to "the most widely accepted current use of the
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Hey, don't call me an Asian! By Rashmee Z. Ahmed Times News Network Tuesday, January 11, 2005 LONDON - Goodness ... over-curried cultural connotations, Brown Britain is calling time on it and asking to be labelled Hindu, Sikh or Muslim instead.

People are asking to be labelled according to their religion? Not according to their region, society, culture or nationality?
Adrian
Hey, don't call me an Asian!.(snipped) "The young Hindu women were incredibly well- spoken. The Muslims were really rough. They didn't really have anything in common at all."

Never send you children to Britain for an education...send them to India. Indians speak beautiful English. The English themselves have lost the ability to speak the Queens English. The BBC used to uphold the Queens English as standard...now the BBC is an embarrassment of dumbed down political misfits from the provinces with accents to match. The BBC is now the embodiment of the sheer awfulness of present day Britain.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Adrian Bailey wrote on 12 Jan 2005:
Hey, don't call me an Asian! By Rashmee Z. Ahmed ... and asking to be labelled Hindu, Sikh or Muslim instead.

People are asking to be labelled according to their religion? Not according to their region, society, culture or nationality?

What is more a product of society and culture than religion?

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
For email, replace numbers with English alphabet.
You are dead wrong, Pal. Good English is available only in England and not in India.
Blah, blah, bollocks.
Adrian
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
it and asking to be labelled Hindu, Sikh or Muslim instead.

So, what would be used for people of Asian origin who are not Hindu, Sikh or Muslim. And how would 'Mulsim' differentiate between Muslims from Asia, those from Africa, those from Europe, etc? Decide whether you want to know a person's religion or their ethnic origin, don't conflate the two.

JGH
it and asking to be labelled Hindu, Sikh or Muslim instead.

So, what would be used for people of Asian origin who are not Hindu, Sikh or Muslim. And how would ... etc? Decide whether you want to know a person's religion or their ethnic origin, don't conflate the two. JGH

A french is french. A german is german. A british is british. An irish is irish. An Indian is Asian? A pakistani is Asian? A bangladeshi is asian? A burmese is asian? Why???
Thanks everyone.
DS
So, what would be used for people of Asian origin ... or their ethnic origin, don't conflate the two. JGH

A french is french. A german is german. A british is british. An irish is irish. An Indian is Asian? A pakistani is Asian? A bangladeshi is asian? A burmese is asian? Why??? Thanks everyone. DS

Here in Hawaii, the 50th state of the US (believe me, this needs to be repeated often because even many American don't know that Hawaii is in the US) nearly all Euro whites are called "haoles" by locals. Police descriptions of white suspects usually do contain the word "haole".
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