+0
I recently wrote an article on Wikipedia about Malaysian English but I'm not sure if all are 100% grammatically correct can someone check for me? or here :

Malaysian English

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Jump to: navigation , search

Malaysian English (MyE) or formally known as Malaysian Standard English (MSE) is a form of English used in Malaysia and is the lingua franca in Malaysia. However, Malaysian English should never be confused with Malaysian Colloquial English which is famously known as Manglish or Street English.

Interestingly, many people here in Malaysia are fluent in two different forms of English – Malaysian Standard English (close to the English spoken by native speakers worldwide) and Malaysian Colloquial English or Manglish (not understood by foreigners) – and are able to switch between them depending on the social situation.

In fact, Manglish is widespread throughout all social classes in Malaysia including bank managers, teachers and doctors.


Contents

[hide]


[edit ]


Malaysian English and British English

In early 20th century, Malaysian English was as exact as the British English (BrE) but is spoken without the accent. However in post-British era (after 1957), the influx of American TV Programmes has influenced the way Malaysian English being used as there is no official board, council or organisation to ensure the correct and standard usage of Malaysian English. This is because after the independence, English has lost its status as official language.

[edit ]


Malaysian English Spelling

In education system, Malaysian English still follows the British English standard. However, it is common to see American spellings in the streets and this is no surprising to Malaysians as they are now learning to accept and and sometimes use American spellings in Malaysia even thought Malaysian English only uses British spellings. All American spellings seen in Malaysia are written and used by private sectors and businesses. For example, centre (British) is typically spelt center (American), although colour and color are used interchangeably. In schools and in the print media, Malaysians default to spelling the British way, i.e. "vapour" instead of "vapor" and "organise" instead of "organize".

[edit ]


Words only used in British English

Malaysian English has also created its own words just like any other former British colonies such as Australia and New Zealand.

To a large extent, standard Malaysian English is descended from British English, largely due to the country's colonisation by Britain beginning from the 18th century . But because of influence from American mass media, particularly in the form of television programmes and movies, Malaysians are also usually familiar with many American English words. For instance, both lift/elevator and lorry/truck are understood, although the British form is preferred. Only in some very limited cases is the American English form more widespread, e.g. chips instead of crisps, fries instead of chips.

[edit ]


Words or phrases only used in Malaysian English

Malaysian English is gradually forming its own vocabulary, these words come from a variety of influences. Typically, for words or phrases that are based on other English words, the Malaysian English speaker may be unaware that the word or phrase is not present in British or American English.

MalaysianBritish / American
Handphone (often abbreviated to HP)Mobile phone or Cell phone
Malaysian Chinese / Malaysian Indian (despite being grammatically incorrect, these terms are considered correct in Malaysian English)Chinese Malaysian / Indian Malaysian
KIV (keep in view)Kept on file, held for further consideration
OutstationMeans both 'out of town' and/or 'overseas/abroad'.
MC (medical certificate). Often used in this context, e.g. 'He is on MC today'Sick note
CanYes/Alright
PhotostatPhotocopy, Xerox
CannotNo
One hundred over, one thousand over etc.Over one hundred, over one thousand etc.


[edit ]


Different Meanings

This is a list of words and phrases that have one meaning in British English and another in Malaysian English

Word / PhraseAmerican / British meaningMalaysian meaning
@short for 'at'an indicator that the name following is a nickname or alias, usually used by Chinese, e.g. for Tan Siew Khoon @ Jimmy, his nickname/alias is Jimmy
driveranybody who drives / is drivinga personal chauffeur / odd job man, often sent on errands
last timeon the previous occurrencepreviously
a parking lota parking garage (from US English)a parking space, e.g. "That new shopping mall has five hundred parking lots."
an alphabeta set of letters used in a languagea letter of the alphabet, e.g. "The word 'table' has five alphabets."
bungalowA small house or cottage usually having a single storey and sometimes an additional attic story that is free standing, i.e. not conjoined with another unit.A mansion for the rich and/or famous; or a fully detached house, regardless of the number of floors it has. Lately, some housing developers have taken the abuse of this word further and we now see terms like "a semi-detached bungalow".


Indeed, by using different dialects of English for international communication and for local use, Malaysia is merely following a worldwide trend. As they become more globalised, they are becoming more protective of their own local identities. Manglish is what makes Malaysia uniquely different from anywhere else on the planet and it is unlikely to disappear.

As most Malaysians are adept at switching from Manglish to Malaysian English, but are sometimes unclear as to the differences between Malaysian Standard and SABE (Standard American-British English), awareness of these differences would prevent misunderstandings when dealing with people from English-speaking backgrounds.

[edit ]


Phonology and Pronunciation

Malaysian English has no distinctive accent. Malaysians use normal way of pronunciation which is based on the International Phonetic system. However some young Malaysians are starting to change their pronunciation habit as they have been either educated in the United States or influenced by American TV programmes. This has made them vibrantly pronouncing 'r' in words such as 'referring' and 'world'.

[edit ]


Role of Malaysian English in independent Malaysia

Even though Malaysian English is no longer the official language in independent Malaysia, it is still used widely among Malaysians and is recognised as Business Language in Malaysia. Almost 80% of business premises and urban places in Malaysia use English (both Malaysian English and Manglish) as medium language.

In Malaysia, there are several major English newspapers namely The Star, The Sun, New Straits Times, Malay Mail and The Edge. There are also English radio stations such as Hitz.FM, Mix FM, Light & Easy, Fly FM, Traxx FM and Red FM. However, there is no pure 100% English TV stations due to Government National Language policy on TV stations that requires all local TV stations to air at least 25% Malaysian-made programmes either in English or Malaysian Language (Bahasa Malaysia). Credits can be given to private TV stations that air Malaysian-made programmes mainly in English. They are TV3, NT7, Hitz.TV and 8TV. Today, all Malaysian TV programmes in Malaysian Language come with English subtitles and vice-versa.

Today's Malaysian English can be categorised into two : the original Malaysian English which is the Malaysian Standard English and the other one; Malaysian Local English (once again not be confused with Manglish) which is the combination of Malaysian English and local languages. Malaysians using Malaysian Local Language usually speak Manglish and they use words such as 'kampung' instead of 'village', 'sin-seh' instead of doctor', 'mamah' instead of 'father-in-law', 'Selamat Hari Raya' instead of 'Happy Eid (Eid Ul-fitr)' and 'Gong Xi Fa Chai' instead of 'Happy Chinese New Year'.

Retrieved from " "

THANKS for helping Emotion: smile It would be great if you guys can just go there and edit my grammar there Emotion: stick out tongue
+0
HaffiezMike
I recently wrote an article on Wikipedia about Malaysian English but I'm not sure if all are 100% grammatically correct can someone check for me? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_English or here :

Malaysian English

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Jump to: navigation , search

Malaysian English (MyE), or formally known as Malaysian Standard English (MSE), is a form of English used in Malaysia and is the lingua franca in Malaysia. However, Malaysian English should never be confused with Malaysian Colloquial English, which is famously known as Manglish or Street English.

Interestingly, many people here in Malaysia are fluent in two different forms of English – Malaysian Standard English (close to the English spoken by native speakers worldwide) and Malaysian Colloquial English or Manglish (not understood by foreigners) – and are able to switch between them depending on the social situation.

In fact, Manglish is widespread throughout all social classes in Malaysia, including bank managers, teachers and doctors.


Contents

[hide]


[edit ]


Malaysian English and British English

In early 20th century, Malaysian English was as exact as the British English (BrE)- but is spoken without the accent. However in post-British era (after 1957), the influx of American TV programmes has influenced the way Malaysian English being used as there is no official board, council or organisation to ensure the correct and standard usage of Malaysian English. This is because, after the independence, English lost its status as official language. or "since the independance English has lost ...

[edit ]


Malaysian English Spelling

In the education system, Malaysian English still follows the British English standard. However, it is common to see American spellings in the streets and this is not surprising to Malaysians as they are now learning to accept and and sometimes use American spellings in Malaysia, even though Malaysian English only uses British spellings. All American spellings seen in Malaysia are written and used by private sectors and businesses. For example, "centre" (British) is typically spelt "center" (American), although "colour" and "color" are used interchangeably. In schools and in the print media, Malaysians default to spelling the British way, i.e. "vapour" instead of "vapor" and "organise" instead of "organize".

[edit ]


Words only used in British English

Malaysian English has also created its own words, just like any other former British colonies (colony?) such as Australia and New Zealand.

To a large extent, standard Malaysian English is descended from British English, largely due to the country's colonisation by Britain beginning from the 18th century . But because of influence from American mass media, particularly in the form of television programmes and movies, Malaysians are also usually familiar with many American English words. For instance, both "lift/elevator" and "lorry/truck" are understood, although the British form is preferred. Only in some very limited cases is the American English form more widespread, e.g. "chips" instead of "crisps", "fries" instead of "chips".

[edit ]


Words or phrases only used in Malaysian English

Malaysian English is gradually forming its own vocabulary, and these words come from a variety of influences. Typically, for words or phrases that are based on other English words, the Malaysian English speaker may be unaware that the word or phrase is not present in British or American English.

MalaysianBritish / American
Handphone (often abbreviated to HP)Mobile phone or Cell phone
Malaysian Chinese / Malaysian Indian (despite being grammatically incorrect, these terms are considered correct in Malaysian English)Chinese Malaysian / Indian Malaysian
KIV (keep in view)Kept on file, held for further consideration
OutstationMeans both 'out of town' and/or 'overseas/abroad'.
MC (medical certificate). Often used in this context, e.g. 'He is on MC today'Sick note
CanYes/Alright
PhotostatPhotocopy, Xerox
CannotNo
One hundred over, one thousand over etc.Over one hundred, over one thousand etc.


[edit ]


Different Meanings

This is a list of words and phrases that have one meaning in British English and another in Malaysian English

Word / PhraseAmerican / British meaningMalaysian meaning
@short for 'at'an indicator that the name following is a nickname or alias, usually used by Chinese, e.g. for Tan Siew Khoon @ Jimmy, his nickname/alias is Jimmy
driveranybody who drives / is drivinga personal chauffeur / odd job man, often sent on errands
last timeon the previous occurrencepreviously
a parking lota parking garage (from US English)a parking space, e.g. "That new shopping mall has five hundred parking lots."
an alphabeta set of letters used in a languagea letter of the alphabet, e.g. "The word 'table' has five alphabets."
bungalowA small house or cottage usually having a single storey and sometimes an additional attic story that is free standing, i.e. not conjoined with another unit.A mansion for the rich and/or famous; or a fully detached house, regardless of the number of floors it has. Lately, some housing developers have taken the abuse of this word further and we now see terms like "a semi-detached bungalow".


Indeed, by using different dialects of English for international communication and for local use, Malaysia is merely following a worldwide trend. As they become more globalised, they are becoming more protective of their own local identities. Manglish is what makes Malaysia uniquely different from anywhere else on the planet and it is unlikely to disappear.

As most Malaysians are adept at switching from Manglish to Malaysian English, but are sometimes unclear as to the differences between Malaysian Standard and SABE (Standard American-British English), awareness of these differences would prevent misunderstandings when dealing with people from English-speaking backgrounds.

[edit ]


Phonology and Pronunciation

Malaysian English has no distinctive accent. Malaysians use the normal way of pronunciation (which is( based on the International Phonetic system. However some young Malaysians are starting to change their pronunciation habits? as they have been either educated in the United States or influenced by American TV programmes. This has made them vibrantly pronouncing 'r' in words such as 'referring' and 'world'.

[edit ]


Role of Malaysian English in independent Malaysia

Even though Malaysian English is no longer the official language in independent Malaysia, it is still used widely among Malaysians and is recognised as Business Language in Malaysia. Almost 80% of business premises and urban places in Malaysia use English (both Malaysian English and Manglish) as medium language.

In Malaysia, there are several major English newspapers namely The Star, The Sun, New Straits Times, Malay Mail and The Edge. There are also English radio stations such as Hitz.FM, Mix FM, Light & Easy, Fly FM, Traxx FM and Red FM. However, there is no pure 100% English TV stations due to Government National Language policy on TV stations that requires all local TV stations to air at least 25% Malaysian-made programmes either in English or Malaysian Language (Bahasa Malaysia). Credits can be given to private TV stations that air Malaysian-made programmes mainly in English. They are TV3, NT7, Hitz.TV and 8TV. Today, all Malaysian TV programmes in Malaysian Language come with English subtitles and vice-versa.

Today's Malaysian English can be categorised into two categories: the original Malaysian English which is the Malaysian Standard English and the other one; Malaysian Local English (once again not be confused with Manglish), which is the combination of Malaysian English, and local languages. Malaysians using Malaysian Local Language usually speak Manglish and they use words such as 'kampung' instead of 'village', 'sin-seh' instead of doctor', 'mamah' instead of 'father-in-law', 'Selamat Hari Raya' instead of 'Happy Eid (Eid Ul-fitr)' and 'Gong Xi Fa Chai' instead of 'Happy Chinese New Year'.

Retrieved from " "

THANKS for helping Emotion: smile It would be great if you guys can just go there and edit my grammar there Emotion: stick out tongue

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Comments  
It looks 'perfect'
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 pieanne's reply was promoted to an answer.
Dear Friends,

this option is very good to learn english , it is usefel when u know english little bit better. but when people is looking to learn they won't communicate in properway.that is why try to give suggetion to learn english for basic knolledge people.

thanks

santhosh
hi haffiez, i need ur help. i'm working on this topic(malaysian english)for my assignment. i found out that u know a lot about this topic.
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