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I'd rather like a paragraph from each of you that ... something in reaction of 'modernism', include what that is too.

Having read some of what you write in other NGs you don't write as a post-modern. Post-modernism is a reaction ... but I was feeling generous, if that's the best word for the action of someone retailing this guff. cheers Chrissy

I can't improve on that Chrissy. Why couldn't YOU be one of my hubby's students? Hmmm .. on second thought, maybe not. (grr)
Fran
I didn't get the joke when FRAN posted, and I ... clear referent ("to prevent its continuation"), what's the big deal?

The big deal is that the writer says nothing in very many words. You are filling in lots of blanks, ... reading the student's final paragraph. That's because the student said nothing. (I had to repeat that so you'd get it.)

I've had to edit enough academic texts where lecturers have said nothing in many words to feel sympathy for the student. They often have very poor examples to follow.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hubby is currently tearing at his hair in another round ... One of his students provided the quote of the night.

I don't think the paragraph says nothing. I think it says something not very well that is true, and includes some things that are not supported, not supportable, or false. Things in all three categories. How old was the writer?

Apparently about Chrissy's age 21.
"Despite its lack of definition, globalisation, has quite a great

The word isn't defined (I think it is) or the limits of the word's applicability isn't defined (It's probably not well defined. Many notions aren't.) But it's not clear which he means.

As Chrissy pointed out above, the writer is clearly treating texts as if they were actors in their own right. She focused on the claim that the improper use of the term had produced "widespread ramifications" but the same objection could have been made to the first sentence as well. It's not the definition from which its impact comes, any more than Darwin's theory of evolution causes people to evolve, or evolve differently once he announces his propositions.
impact on society., the world and people as a whole. Its ramifications

People as a whole is equivalent to society. Individual people might be what he meant, but he didn't say it.

FWIW the student was female. I'd sooner use the right pronoun.

One of the problems common amongst students is to imagine, without directly taking it on board, that what exists now has pretty much always been the case.
There was a new globalisation that was driven by the capitalist economy.

In practice the systems of the countries involved may have been capitalist (even China), but I don't think it requires ... used locally), larger ships and cheaper transportation; and telegraph, telephones, television, satellites, and computerized data transmission, including audio and video.

The much greater ease with which data can be moved about is undoubtedly a critical factor. It's now possible for many services to be outsourced to anywhere with a connection to the web. The spread of culture too is greatly facilitated by modern communication. Growing urbanisation in the less developed world and the creation of a cheap, compliant low to semi-skilled source of labour and the prodigious industrial growth of China which has underpinned the US economy have all contributed to patterns of trade that sit well with less robust barriers to the movement of goods and services across national frontiers. The first world wants cheap consumer goods and the less developed world (I use the term ignoring the coercion that underpins it) is willing to give it because relatively speaking their elites benefit from it.
Is capitalism required? Isn't Viet Nam still communist? I see clothes for sale in the States that are made in Viet Nam.

Vietnam was never communist. It was commandist for sure, but it was a largely agrarian economy that was smashed up by the conflict and that had to retool itself quite quickly, in the teeth of US trade restrictions.
"Free trade" is not dependant on the economic system of the countries involved, but on tariff and treaty arrangements. I ... retirement before their factories closed, while warning young people coming into the labour market that some industries would fade away.

I don't see tariffs as the way to go. I doubt it is ethical to try to harm the trade prospects of a nation much poorer than one's own. I think a much more all encompassing set of arrangements are needed to look after everyone than tariffs can hope to provide in any event.
But people wanted low prices right away, and politicians wanted to make them happy.

Some of it is driven by simple chauvinism or parochialism or a romantic attachment to things past or all three. There are genuine issues of workers rights and sovreignty both in the metropolitan power and the LDCs involved, but these can only be resolved through a change in organisation of the world economy more profound than most of the anti-globalisers have in mind. Given the right underpinning structures, I'm very much in favour of globalisation.
Either that or they've made points I discarded as stupid. Or, by using force at these demonstrations or for some ... because manufacturing is moved to Malaysia or China, that elsewhere in the American (etc.) economy someone is making more money.

which people have resisted globalisation are varied even without government support."

You're right, he should name some. But, come to think of it, isn't this the final paragraph? Did he name any earlier?

No, she didn't. Again as Chrissy said, it's not at all clear what this sentence even means to claim about the relationship between government support and the protests.
Look, I know about bad writing, I still cringe when I recall something I wrote in the 9th grade. I ... amount of writing of all similarly valued fields. If this guy doesn't get better, maybe he can do the same.

Perhaps. Maybe she needs to sit down with a piuece of paper and write down all the things she thinks are relevant, seek support for them, and then organise them into a coherent whole. Then she should pass it to someone else who is literate to read and critique.

Fran
I think it has always been associated with economics. Weren't ... think the possibility of an alternative has occurred to him.

One of the problems common amongst students is to imagine, without directly taking it on board, that what exists now has pretty much always been the case.

I certainly react that way sometimes. When I move to a new neighborhood, I tend to think that all my neighbors have been there for 20 years or more, even if they only moved in a week before I did.

Are there any communist countries?
largely agrarian economy that was smashed up by the conflict and that had to retool itself quite quickly, in the teeth of US trade restrictions.

"Free trade" is not dependant on the economic system of ... into the labour market that some industries would fade away.

I don't see tariffs as the way to go. I doubt it is ethical to try to harm the trade prospects of a nation much poorer than one's own. I

The goal is to help ourselves. We would not be tryign to harm anyone. Those other countries have the whole rest of the world to trade with, if they don't implement tariffs. Why do these other countries have to industrialize in the first place?
think a much more all encompassing set of arrangements are needed to look after everyone than tariffs can hope to provide in any event.

BTW, 21 is pretty old to write like this. Although the topic is complicated and a lot of big words were used, I still thought she was in high school. But my recollection of the others' work may be faulty, or maybe I never knew.
s/ meirman
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One of the problems common amongst students is to imagine, ... what exists now has pretty much always been the case.

I certainly react that way sometimes. When I move to a new neighborhood, I tend to think that all my neighbors have been there for 20 years or more, even if they only moved in a week before I did.

I can always wow my students with descriptions of outside toilets without sewerage, bakelite phones, the first video game air hockey played on a B&W TV and descriptions of the operation of a telex machine. They loom at me as if I have managed to survive the dark ages a relic of an unimaginably distant past.
The much greater ease with which data can be moved ... communist. It was commandist for sure, but it was a

Are there any communist countries?

No. There are some countries that don't have functioning internal market economies responsible for the allocation of goods North Korea might be one, I'm not sure about Laos or the precise role played by the market in Cambodia, but certainly these are not communist countries, so much as highly regulated statist economies, with some market features.
largely agrarian economy that was smashed up by the conflict ... prospects of a nation much poorer than one's own. I

The goal is to help ourselves. We would not be tryign to harm anyone.

If you're trying to privilege your own domestic producers' goods and services over another's purely on the basis of place of manufacture you're certainly trying to deprive them of the income they might have had on an ethnic basis.
Those other countries have the whole rest of the world to trade with, if they don't implement tariffs.

So we say take your business elsewhere and set ourselves up as some kind of Potemkin Village? And what if others in the first world adopt the same view. Why would that not be reasonable?
Why do these other countries have to industrialize in the first place?

So they can enjoy what we take for granted and what you suggest we erect tariffs to defend?
think a much more all encompassing set of arrangements are needed to look after everyone than tariffs can hope to provide in any event.

BTW, 21 is pretty old to write like this. Although the topic is complicated and a lot of big words were used, I still thought she was in high school.

I teach high school and if she were a 15 or 16-year-old I'd not be so harsh. But at 21 or so (she may have been a little younger perhaps
20) she really ought to have leanred how to put her ideas together attertiary level. According to the hubby, she's not a bimbo, but she's obviously someone who has been allowed to get intellectually sloppy, presumably by others.
Fran
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
When hubby sat down, to mark, he swallowed a glass ... in thinking this an intellectually execrable, thoough laughable post-modern drivel.

I'd rather like a paragraph from each of you that defines what 'post-modern' means. If it refers to it as something in reaction of 'modernism', include what that is too.

I wouldn't worry about it. If you're ever caught doing something slightly shameful such as laughing at Benny Hill or tucking your vest into your underpants, just claim that you were doing it in a post-modern ironic way and you'll be off the hook.
Phil C.
(snip)

Richard Yates demonstrated how much content there was in the paragraph in his post. I repost his paragraph:
(quote)
"Despite its lack of definition, premistrofication, has quite a great impact on society, the world and people as a whole. Its ramifications are widespread, and many of them are caused by the improper use of the term. In the 1990s, premistrofication became associated with economics. There was a new premistrofication that was driven by the capitalist economy. This as well as the fear of premistrofication as inevitable and
without any benefits changed the public's view of the world and led to many people taking action to prevent its continuation. The ways in which people have resisted premistrofication are varied even without government support."
(/quote)
All of your objections are, I think, declawed and disarmed and debunked by the substitution of a nonsense word for "globalisation". We can even replace "globalisation" with "terrorism" or "undocumented immigration" and the new paragraphs work just about as well.

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor who fears premistrofication intensely.
For email, replace English alphabet with hyphenated two-digit numbers (ie include all leading zeros).
Django Cat turpitued:

I've just looked up 'Black Douglas' - a 'grain and ... proper Malt Fran, he'll get through the marking nae problem.

A proper malt tends to be rather expensive in Australia. I suppose that's OK if you take only the occasional drop, but a pile of 100 papers to mark can use up almost an entire bottle.

Good point. I've got 30 exam scripts to mark this evening (usenet as displacement activity yet again). Now, where's the meths?

DC
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Do you mean the period (plus comma) following "society," or ... Fran's posts yet to make an educated call about this.)

It was indeed the concluding paragraph. The sarcastic tone reflected my view that the student had rather muddied the waters rather than tying her thoughts into a neat and comprehensible bundle at the end.

I sometimes comfort anxious pre-examination students by telling them what the agreed marking guidelines for a pass mark are: the student appears to understand the question, and to know what kind of answer is required, but doesn't have a clue what the answer is.

We all have to do our bit to acommodate our (UK) Govt's ambition to get 50% of the population through university :-)
I recall the memo we lecturers received about our own behaviour when invigilating student exams, during which we often mark student homework or another exam. We were requested, when doing such marking, to avoid laughing, grimacing, or making other expressions of humour, despair, etc., since the students we were invigilating found this upsetting.
One takes quite a different attitude to this kind of thing when one has retired :-)

Chris Malcolm (Email Removed) +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205 IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK (http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/)
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