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Would appreciate if some one should help me with my question….

I’d like to know among the two corresponding sentences, which is correct and which is not.

Or, both are correct.

I am getting impatient with “your” keeping secrets from me.

I am getting impatient with “you” keeping secrets from me.

I insisted on “his” going.

I insisted on “him” going.

She suggested “them” forming a study group.

She suggested “their” forming a study group.

I like his coming to my house.

I like him coming to my house.

I saw him smiling.

I saw his smiling.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Cool BreezeI like it that he comes to my house would be correct.
Oops! I left out the it. Where were you four years ago when I wrote that? Emotion: smile
CJ
AvangiI thought all the "-ing" words in this thread were both gerunds and present participles.
Isolated -ing words on their own can be used as either gerunds or participles, but once the -ingword appears in a specific usage in a specific sentence it's one or the other. Gerunds are verb-noun/noun-verb sorts of critters; participles are verb-adjective/adjective-verb sorts of critters. Emotion: smile
CJ
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CalifJim
Cool BreezeI like it that he comes to my house would be correct.
Oops! I left out the it. Where were you four years ago when I wrote that?
Now, let me think... [:^)] Early August 2002, I was on a Greek island called Kos having lunch at a beach restaurant and watching all the sexy blond Swedish girls wiggling by on their way to the sea.Emotion: smile
CB
PS: My apologies for not replying sooner to all those who have posted replies after my last post. This is because I don't receive notifications of replies to my posts in the General Grammar Questions. Punkybrewster is attending to the problem.
They tried to prevent the plane from landing on the runway.

Is the "from" optional?
sitifanIs the "from" optional?
Yes, I suppose you could say that, but it's only omitted in very casual styles. You would use the from in formal, academic writing, for example. Personally, I always include it, even in everyday conversation.

CJ
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CalifJim
AvangiI thought all the "-ing" words in this thread were both gerunds and present participles.
Isolated -ing words on their own can be used as either gerunds or participles, but once the -ing word appears in a specific usage in a specific sentence it's one or the other. Gerunds are verb-noun/noun-verb sorts of critters; participles are verb-adjective/adjective-verb sorts of critters. CJ
I can't believe I wrote that. I surely didn't mean it as a general statement (did I?). I seem to recall something special about the ones in this thread. Hmmm. But thanks much for calling it to my attention. Happy you know what!

BTW, I thought "I like that he comes to my house" was okay.

Okay, I just noticed that this thread is antediluvian. I'll join CB in restructuring.
AvangiOkay, I just noticed that this thread is antediluvian.
So true.
AvangiBTW, I thought "I like that he comes to my house" was okay
Me too. It was so long ago I don't even want to think about it anymore. Emotion: smile

CJ
Yankee Click on the word here and it will take you where CB wanted you to go.
???

Thanks for this, Amy. I remember reading CB's post, but it was worth re-reading. Somehow I missed yours.

It seems like this techinque of referencing the web popped up on my radar screen only a few months ago. I've always meant to ask someone how to set it up.

- A.
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CalifJimI insisted on “his” going. OK
I insisted on “him” going. Not as good.
I insisted that he go. Better.
Better than what? Is it better than the above two sentences or only the second sentence?
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