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Would appreciate if some one should help me with my question….

I’d like to know among the two corresponding sentences, which is correct and which is not.

Or, both are correct.

I am getting impatient with “your” keeping secrets from me.

I am getting impatient with “you” keeping secrets from me.

I insisted on “his” going.

I insisted on “him” going.

She suggested “them” forming a study group.

She suggested “their” forming a study group.

I like his coming to my house.

I like him coming to my house.

I saw him smiling.

I saw his smiling.
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Comments  
The choice between the possessive and the direct object forms is difficult in the context you present. It appears to be dependent on the preceding verb or adjective. Sometimes native speakers use a form different from the one recommended in grammar books. In most cases the possessive is regarded as better, but the object form is widely used anyway.

Here are my preferences as a native speaker of American English.

I am getting impatient with “your” keeping secrets from me. OK
I am getting impatient with “you” keeping secrets from me. Not as good.

I insisted on “his” going. OK
I insisted on “him” going. Not as good.
I insisted that he go. Better.

She suggested “them” forming a study group. NO
She suggested “their” forming a study group. OK?
She suggested that they form a study group. Better.

I like his coming to my house. NO
I like him coming to my house. OK.
I like that he comes to my house. OK.

I saw him smiling. OK
I saw his smiling. NO.
I wanted but could not expect reply.

Thanks very much, CalifJim.

pructus
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How about the acceptability of the following sentences?

1. Mother hates us playing indoors.

2. Mother hates our playing indoors.

3. It is no use of you trying to cheat me.

4. It is no use of your trying to cheat me.

5. There is little chance of him being rejected.

6. There is little chance of his being rejected.
TeoHow about the acceptability of the following sentences?

1. Mother hates us playing indoors.

2. Mother hates our playing indoors.

3. It is no use of you trying to cheat me.

4. It is no use of your trying to cheat me.

5. There is little chance of him being rejected.

6. There is little chance of his being rejected.
1. OK 2. No. 3,4 It's no use trying to cheat me. 5. OK. 6. OK - more formal than 5.
To my ear, verbs of loving (liking) and hating are best formulated as loves (likes, hates) it when.
Mother hates it when we play indoors.
CJ
Hi Jim,

Re the possessive with the present participle, I agree that "I saw his smiling," sounds a little strange, but "I like his coming," doesn't bother me. Can you say anything to help categorize these models, helping explain why you reject them and accept "I insisted on his going"?

Thanks, - A.

Edit. Sorry, I hadn't seen your reply to Teo.
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CalifJimI like his coming to my house. NO
I like him coming to my house. OK.
I like that he comes to my house. OK.

I saw him smiling. OK
I saw his smiling. NO.
Hi Jim
In Helsinki English I like his coming to my house is perfectly acceptable whereas I like that he comes to my house is wrong. I like it that he comes to my house would be correct.
I saw his smiling should be incorrect in all varieties of English as smiling isn't a gerund and thus can't have a subject. It is a present participle, which is one of the two alternatives after verbs of perception in the active voice.
More about the subject of the gerund He insisted on my/me singing a song.

CB
Cool BreezeMore about the subject of the gerund here
Hi CB,

Where?

To show you how dumb I am, I thought all the "-ing" words in this thread were both gerunds and present participles.

Best wishes, - A.
Avangi
Cool BreezeMore about the subject of the gerund here
Hi CB,
Where?
To show you how dumb I am, I thought all the "-ing" words in this thread were both gerunds and present participles.
Best wishes, - A.
Click on the word here and it will take you whereCB wanted you to go. Emotion: smile
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