I would like to know what is difference between Hire and Rent?
Hmm...I'd say that's a difficult one, actually! Personally I would use "hire" pretty much exclusively with people, including maybe "hire a taxi" because this is only for a short time and includes the driver (although, cometo think of it, I would prefer to say "book a taxi" anyway).

Rent for me has to do with objects, like flats, apartments, cars...

I think there is a difference between the types of English though. As far as I can tell, my version would be the British one...
Greetings Shahnaz, it’s good that you have asked the difference between Rent and hire

First of all you should know that hire and rent has same meaning, you pay money in order to be allowed to use it for a limited amount of time. It is simply a matter of usage. With some nouns you can use one or the other – it doesn’t matter which as both are freely used. You can: rent or hire cars, bikes, electronic equipment:

  • 'We rented a TV and video as we intended to stay in England for only six months.'
  • 'If you’re planning to go to Cambridge for the day, hire a bike when you arrive. It’s the best way to get round the town.'
With other nouns it is customary in British English to use one and not the other. We would: rent a flat, caravan, cottage, house:
  • 'I rented a cottage by the sea for the summer.'
  • 'He rented me his flat in London while he was on holiday in Greece.'
(However, note the difference in use, depending on whether it is used as a verb or a noun: ‘flats to rent’, but ‘bikes for hire’)

We hire some help (i.e people), tools, equipment:
  • 'I had too much to do on the farm, so I decided to hire some help three mornings a week.'
  • 'The police enquiries were making no progress, so we decided to hire a private detective.'
  • 'I was painting the outside of the house and had to hire a tall ladder to get to the top.'
Source : http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv72.shtml

Kindly visit Learning BBC English website [In future, Just In case]

Regards !
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As already discussed, the difference lies more on the collocation.

As for the car, hire or rent a car are different.

When you hire a car, you will be the passanger of the car, and ask the driver to take you wherever you like.

But if you rent a car, you get the premission to use the car on your own in return of some money, therefore you will be the driver and you are in control of the car.

I hope it helps
dear obaidtariq, thanks very much for your good explanations and the Link . Of course i will study it again on bbc site. but i have a question ,for exaple for hiring someone to do something , Do the british and American people use hire someone for example: The company hires them to work. I`m not sure about british because i read somewhere that British use rent in this regard .Is that right?
most welcome dear, Im here to assist whenever you need .. well, I presume both American and British use "hire" in your above mentioned example .. These words change their meaning according to scenarios. For example in the case of "Car Leasing" or "phone" you can use rent.

hope you got it.

regards Emotion: smile
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As this very good site meantioned before very well explains:

We hire some help (i.e people), tools, equipment:
  • 'I had too much to do on the farm, so I decided to hiresome help three mornings a week.'

  • 'The police enquiries were making no progress, so we decided to hire a private detective.'

  • 'I was painting the outside of the house and had to hire a tall ladder to get to the top.'
This also contains an example of hire with an object, that seems OK to me, so I have to correct myself on what I said before. However most "objects" that will normally be lent in exchange for money are rented, in my oppinion.

I would never use "rent" with a person. "Rent" has this idea of "using" behind it, that does not seem appropriate with people. "Rentboy" is the only word that comes to my mind, and there is obviously a "using" part to this.
Ok, thanks very much for your reply .It was helpful explanation.