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UC filted:
UC filted: And pipe fittings..

Correct.

Unfortunately, in plumbing and other mechanical contexts, the gadget for adapting a male fitting to attach where a female one is expected, or vice versa, is called a "gender-changer"..
There is no winning this fight, which is appropriate considering the subject matter...(it's been said that the war between the sexes will never be resolved because there's so much fraternizing with the enemy)..r

"Screwing Type Gloomy - Giant Swing" Gloomy makes your world turn around! Watch out for this charming toy teddy-bear that amazes you with his agile walking skills through a special wind-up mechanism. Enjoy the joyful company of this active playing wonder right away!
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No, I just reject the feminist ideology, because it rests on factual errors and deliberate misinterpretations of history.

There was some of that going on. There were also some very good points, and in the century since we ... what they mean when they say it. The meanings of gender given there owe nothing to any imagined feminist imperialism.

The OED weighs in as follows with regard to the "sex" meaaning of "gender":
"In modern (esp. feminist) use, a euphemism for the sex of a human being, often intended to emphasize the social and cultural, as opposed to the biological, distinctions between the sexes."

J.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Sentence in question: "You can all but hear the engineer ... mistake. The engineer in question is unseen and gender unknown.

No, his 'sex' is unknown. The word 'gender' does not refer to persons or animals, but to words only.

Really? Fascinating.
No, his 'sex' is unknown. The word 'gender' does not refer to persons or animals, but to words only.

Really? Fascinating.

Men and women are different sexes.
'Mann' and 'Frau' are words with different genders.
I also want to add a couple of references that indicate that the "long history" is very long indeed, taking ... hevenly father do vnto you except ye forgeve with youre hertes eache one to his brother their treaspases. (Tyndale, 1526).

Well, yeah; but I think that if these instances reveal anything about God's use of third-person pronouns, it is that He is as easily confused as many of us when the referent (e.g., "each one" or "every one", etc.) is grammatically singular but semantically plural.
But I think that I, at least, may tend to use singular they when the sex of the referent is not unknown so much as grammatically unspecified. For example, if someone of either sex telephoned, asked for a third party, but would not leave a message, I might very well report the conversation as follows: "Someone called for you." "Oh, who?" "They didn't say." And I think I would use "they" in this instance even if I could tell quite clearly from the pitch of the voice the sex of the caller.

I think I could also be the first speaker in this conversation: "Your dentist's office called." "Oh, why?" "They didn't say." Here, grammatically the referent is neuter; semantically singular and probably identifiable by me as to sex; yet because of the lack of specificity in the referent I might very well be tempted to use "they".
Gary Williams
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The meanings of gender given there owe nothing to any imagined feminist imperialism.

The OED weighs in as follows with regard to the "sex" meaaning of "gender": "In modern (esp. feminist) use, a euphemism for the sex of a human being, often intended to emphasize the social and cultural, as opposed to the biological, distinctions between the sexes."

I didn't know that.
The feminists may have started it, but it caught on.

A lot of the things the feminists tried to suggest in language did not. Fortunately. Some were just plain silly.

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
I also want to add a couple of references that ... hertes eache one to his brother their treaspases. (Tyndale, 1526).

Well, yeah; but I think that if these instances reveal anything about God's use of third-person pronouns, it is that ... sex; yet because of the lack of specificity in the referent I might very well be tempted to use "they".

I would agree, because in this instance 'they' represents the entire office, eevn though only one person was spoeaking. Of course, it is possible for one person to place the call, and another person or persons to get on the line later, all of which is behind the 'they'.
The meanings of gender given there owe nothing to any imagined feminist imperialism.

You poor dupe...

But the real point is that it no longer matters how or why a given usage came to be standard. Once it is, it is. Period. If some day people no longer know that "***" is supposed to mean "stingy," "***" won't mean "stingy" any more, and the fact that this came about because of "***"'s strong resemblance to a racial slur will be of interest but irrelevant to what the word does and does not mean.
A given dictionary may supply some information about how a given usage came about, but etymology cannot trump usage, and what you need from a dictionary is a report on how words are used today. The primary use of the dictionary is to answer the inquiry "What does the word mean?" and meaning is determined by actual usage, so that's what the dictionary is supposed to supply. It may supply more, but all the rest is secondary.
Follow the drift of such words as "nice" and "presently." One can assign causes to the drift, but what ultimately matters is neither the drift nor the cause but the result.
As Humpty Dumpty has been quoted (by Lewis Carroll) as saying, "That's glory for you."

Bob Lieblich
A real knock-down arguer
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Dictionaries list all the meanings used by people, even when they are hopelessly confused. Does it not make more sense to use words to clarify, rather than confuse?

The word "sex" can be confusing too, don't you think?
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