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Dictionaries do not list hopelessly confused or erroneous meanings without ... the way it was, mainly because you wish it were.

No, I just reject the feminist ideology, because it rests on factual errors and deliberate misinterpretations of history.

Feminism is nothing more than the idea that men and women should enjoy equal rights.
Men and women are different sexes. 'Mann' and 'Frau' are words with different genders.

Right on both counts. Both Mann and Frau are in my American Heritage dictionary. Horace and Thomas Mann were both of the masculine gender, since they were men. And since Frau is "used as a courtesy title for women in German-speaking areas," it presumably refers to those dainty persons of the feminine gender, as you and I are wont to say.
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The 'sex', not the 'gender' is unknown.

You keep saying that, but I think they're BOTH unknown. German has handy gender differences in its articles, so I can usually tell the gender of a noun. But with English, "the" doesn't tell me anything. So, with "the doctor," "the engineer," etc. both the sex AND the gender are unknown.
UC filted:

Correct.

Unfortunately, in plumbing and other mechanical contexts, the gadget for adapting a male fitting to attach where a female one is expected, or vice versa, is called a "gender-changer"..

In electrical applications, where the corresponding question arises with respect to male and female plugs, we duck the question. A sex changer is simply known as an "adapter". (Also "adaptor", by those who are uncertain of the spelling.)
The word "adapter" is also used for various connectors that do not change the sex, but it would spoil the story if I told you that.
There is no winning this fight, which is appropriate considering the subject matter...(it's been said that the war between the sexes will never be resolved because there's so much fraternizing with the enemy)..r

According to Google:
"war between the sexes": 75,200
"war between the genders": 1,260
What's a sex-neutral term for "fraternizing"?

Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org

Please note the changed e-mail and web addresses. The domain eepjm.newcastle.edu.au no longer exists, and I can no longer receive mail at my newcastle.edu.au addresses. The optusnet address could disappear at any time.
Uzytkownik "Peter Moylan" (Email Removed) napisal w wiadomosci
What's a sex-neutral term for "fraternizing"?

Siblinging?
Cheers,
L.
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You poor dupe...

But the real point is that it no longer matters how or why a given usage came to be standard. Once it is, it is. Period.

Not if everybody doesn't agree. I, among many others, don't.
Men and women are different sexes. 'Mann' and 'Frau' are words with different genders.

Right on both counts. Both Mann and Frau are in my American Heritage dictionary. Horace and Thomas Mann were both ... areas," it presumably refers to those dainty persons of the feminine gender, as you and I are wont to say.

The WORD 'der Mann' is masculine in GENDER. The concept 'man' to which the word 'der Mann' refers involves the male sex. Likewise with 'die Frau' and 'woman'.
The 'sex', not the 'gender' is unknown.

You keep saying that, but I think they're BOTH unknown.

But you're wrong in thinking that.
German has handy gender differences in its articles, so I can usually tell the gender of a noun. But with English, "the" doesn't tell me anything. So, with "the doctor," "the engineer," etc. both the sex AND the gender are unknown.[/nq]No. The gender is indeterminite or non-existent. Waiter/waitress, sorcerer/sorceress, executor/executrix, are marked for gender, 'Doctress' is obsolete, so far as I know. Most other occupational words are not marked for gender at all. 'Engineer', 'baker', 'accountant', etc. are not marked for gender. If the sex of the person is unknown, the pronouns used are "he/his/him", in which case it is understood that the sex of the individual is unknown, and that the "he/his/him" is therefore indeterminate gender.

In this case, "he/his/him" are DEFAULT pronouns, which is desirable for convenience' sake. To say "well, OI don't know whether the accountant was a man or woman" every time is clumsy or stupid, so we just say "he/his/him" and understand that it could well be a woman. Surely we can hanfdle that. In German, exactly the same thing is done with the pronoun 'man' (usually translated as 'one'). This is equivalent to 'one' in expressions such as "one just does not behave in that way" or "one would hope".

If 'man' is used in a sentence, 'der' is used as the pronomial reference. "Man, der..." is equivalent to "one who...".
"Denn siehe, ich will einen neuen Himmel und eine neue Erde schaffen, da=DF man der vorigen nicht mehr gedenken wird noch sie zu Herzen nehmen;"
"Kann man der Plautdietsch redet andere Niederdeutsche Mundarten verstehen? Das heisst, gibt es sprachliche =DCbereinkunft?"

"=2E..man der..." in these quotes means "one who", and it does not imply the male sex even though 'der' is a masculine pronoun.
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But the real point is that it ... came to be standard. Once it is, it is. Period.

Not if everybody doesn't agree. I, among many others, don't.

No single person, or even a fairly large group of people, can veto a usage that has become standard.
Majority rules.

Stephen
Lennox Head, Australia
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