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I am confused about these:

Each of the students is doing _____ homework.

Every students is doing ______ homework.

A. his B. Their

For each sentence, which one should I choose to fill in the blank?

Thanks!
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Each of the students is doing his or her homework.
or
Each of the students is doing their homework.
Every STUDENT (then same as in the above)
Sorry, I don't agree with you.
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I presume the 'his' or 'their' can be used only once.

Each of the students is doing his homework. (Strictly speaking, it should be 'his' or 'her')

Every student is doing their homework. (Strictly speaking, it should be 'his' or 'her'.)

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I presume we should use either 'his' or 'their' to fill in each blank. We cannot use either word twice.

Each of the students is doing his homework. (Strictly speaking, it should be 'his' or 'her')

Every student is doing their homework. (Strictly speaking, it should be 'his' or 'her'.)
Yoong LiatI presume the 'his' or 'their' can be used only once.

Each of the students is doing his homework. (Strictly speaking, it should be 'his' or 'her')
Wrong and not politically correct today.
You can say any of the:
Each of the students is doing his homework.
Each of the students is doing her homework.
Each of the students is doing his or her homework. [and this is considered by many as being the most politically correct, by explicitly mentioning both genders.]
"Their" has become extremely common as a substitute for "his or her" - it's now considered fine to use it with a singular antecendent in all but the most formal circumstances. However, it's possible that an English teacher would consider the classroom to be a formal circumstance.

The second sentence is simply incorrect, not matter what you do to it. Every students is wrong.
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