+0
Little John: I'd like to join your company.
Robin Hood: You shall. If you can hold a breach like you
held that bridge
, (If he can fight against raiding soldiers the
way he did on the bridge?) you're one of us. Welcome.
+0
Hi,

breach - a gap made in a fortification, usually by artillery.

Shakespeare famously has Henry V say this, while fighting to capture a city.

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
Yes. A breach is a gap or opening in the wall, defenses or line of soldiers. A breach is dangerous in combat because opposing forces will be able to flank a defending line or get inside the walls.

Perhaps you've read this:

"Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead." Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
A breach is an opening, especially in a defensive line or a fortification. Robin is hoping that Little John could defend such an opening the way he defended the bridge.
Thank you!
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.