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1. I don't get the idea... do we say "holiday" or "holidays" ?
2. Am I supposed to say "I'm going on holidays to England this year" or "I'm going on holiday to England this year"
3. When is "holiday" countable and when is it uncountable?
4. "Every time the subject of holidays comes up. Ruth and her husband have an argument" - can I use "holiday" here? why/why not?

best wishes,

thanks,
Comments 
Forum_mail1. I don't get the idea... do we say "holiday" or "holidays" ?
2. Am I supposed to say "I'm going on holidays to England this year" or "I'm going on holiday to England this year"
3. When is "holiday" countable and when is it uncountable?
4. "Every time the subject of holidays comes up. Ruth and her husband have an argument" - can I use "holiday" here? why/why not?

best wishes,

thanks,

In the States, the time between Thanksgiving and New Years is generally called "the holidays" or "the holiday season". A holiday is any specific day set aside to commemorate an event or a person (4th of July, Veterans Day). We can have a favorite holiday or two favorite holidays. Americans do not go "on holiday", as do our British cousins: we are "on vacation", even if we aren't taking a trip.
thanks! could you answer points 1 and 3 ? I'm still not sure whether it's ok to say "holidays" or not
Forum_mailthanks! could you answer points 1 and 3 ? I'm still not sure whether it's ok to say "holidays" or not
I think I answered #3. Someone from your side of the pond will have to answer #2.
Forum_mail1. I don't get the idea... do we say "holiday" or "holidays" ?
2. Am I supposed to say "I'm going on holidays to England this year" or "I'm going on holiday to England this year"
3. When is "holiday" countable and when is it uncountable?
4. "Every time the subject of holidays comes up. Ruth and her husband have an argument" - can I use "holiday" here? why/why not?

best wishes,

thanks,

1/3: I suppose the best way to use them is to decide if you are referring to a specific holiday or to holidays in general.
2: Either "I am taking my holiday(s) in England this year" OR "I'm going on holiday to England this year"
4: No, because in this context it is not just one holiday that is under discussion.
In the sense of "vacation", either holiday or holidays is considered grammatically correct. However, the British will almost always use the singular form. I find the plural more common among people who speak English as a second language.