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1) He gave me a hollow promise.

2) He gave me an armchair promise.

3) he game me a lip promise.

Which one is correct? any other synonym? which is commonly used in daily conversation.

thanks alot
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I've never heard the expressions "armchair promise" or "lip promise."
I have heard the expression "lip service". It is more general describing a long history of empty promises and talk on a particular issue or subject.
  • Congress and the White House have paid much lip service to improving the nation's energy independence.
  • Well, they'll give us lip service, but when push comes to shove we're going to have to do this on our own.
Comments  
"Hollow promise" is fine. "Lip promise" also makes sense but is, in my experience, much less common. I've never heard of an "armchair promise".

The expression that I think I'd be most likely to use in conversation, should I want to say such a thing, is "empty promise".
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Could any of you explain "armchair promise"? What does an armchair have to do with an empty or hollow promise?
VinceCould any of you explain "armchair promise"?

If it's a genuine expression, all I can imagine is that it means a promise made from the comfort of your armchair, perhaps while having a friendly chat with someone, which then evaporates when you leave this cosy setting. As I say, though, I've never heard of it. I'm wondering if it's possibly an idiom from another language that's been translated literally.
 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
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