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A. I'm home.
B. I'm at home.
C. I'm in home.
D. I'm in the home.

1. Which of the above are natural responses?
2. Do they all mean the same?
3. If I change 'home' to 'house', will the answers be the same as those for #1?
1 2 3
Comments  
1. A and B are natural responses.
2. C is not correct. D could only be used something after it. For example " I'm in the home of Mr John Smith" - You might here this on a TV programme where the interviewer / decorator (whatever) wants to tell you about their location.
A and B mean the same thing. A can be used to announce your arrival but B can' t. B can tell people where you are at that time - Where are you? - I'm at home. With a time reference they can be used in the same way in current speech. " I'm home this evening if you want to call me." "I'm at home this evening if you want to call me."
3. No - "house" is not the same as "home" and always needs a determiner.

Where are you? - I am at MY house.
I'm in THE house of Mr John Smith
I'm at MY house tonight. I'm at MY parents house tonight.

If you tell someone " I am at MY house this evening" this suggests that you are not always to be found there.

Hope this helps
Thank you for answering all my questions. Your explanations are really helpful.

1. Just an additional question, do you think it's also natural to say the following?

I'm at MY home.
I'm in MY home.

I'm at THE house of Mr. John Smith. (Do you think 'in the house of...' is more natural?)

2. Is it also OK to simply say 'I'm in the house.' to the question 'Where are you?' if it's understood between the persons that 'THE house' means where the person being asked lives?

3. Is there also a difference between 'in' and 'at' in the example? Do you think 'in' means inside the house and 'at' means around or within the area of the house?
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Hello

I am glad that my answers helped you.

1. I think it is more natural to say " I'm at home". You do not need to say "my home" as this is assumed unless you specify that it is someone else's home. If you want to use "my" then you say " I'm at my house" - normally in this case you would stress the "my".

1/3 - The last part of q1 is the answer to your q3. Yes you are correct. So "at the house" means either in or around and "in the house" is inside. You could say you were at the house if you were, for example, in the garden of that house.

2. Yes. When I was a student I shared a house with a number of people and we all referred to it as "the house". So if asked "where are you" the answer would be " I am at the house". We all used "home" at that time to refer to the houses we returned to during the vacations. Another example might be an estate agent waiting for a client, you could imagine this as a conversation on a mobile phone if one is already at the house to be visited and the other stuck in traffic or elsewhere.

Regards
Louise
All of your stuff were taken outside.
All of your stuff was taken outside.

Many of your stuff were given away.
Many of your stuff was given away.
Which is correct?
Hi LouiseT,

Thank you so much for your response. You've covered everything I needed to know. It was very kind of you assisting me. Emotion: smile

I just have one last question, if I may, and it's probably just a simple one to native speakers like you.
LouiseTA can be used to announce your arrival but B can' t. B can tell people where you are at that time - Where are you? - I'm at home.
Can we also naturally respond with "I'm home" to the question "Where are you?"? Do you think "I'm home" in this case is more casual than "I'm at home"?

Again, thank you for all your help.
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If someone were to ask me the question "where are you?" I would respond "I'm at home", I would never respond "I'm home", I am British. My American colleagues tell me that they would respond "I'm home". I understand that the Americans use fewer prepositions in informal speech.

Louise
AnonymousIf someone were to ask me the question "where are you?" I would respond "I'm at home", I would never respond "I'm home", I am British. My American colleagues tell me that they would respond "I'm home". I understand that the Americans use fewer prepositions in informal speech.Louise
Sorry - I forgot to log in.

Louise
Are you the same Anonymous I wonder?

"Stuff" is singular and not countable.

All of your stuff was taken outside.
AnonymousMany of your stuff were given away.
Many of your stuff was given away.
Neither of these phrases are correct. As "stuff" is not countable you cannot have "many" of it.

Many of your things were given away.
or
A lot of your stuff was given away.

hope this helps

Louise
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