re: Homicide Vs Murder page 2

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As you will see in my earlier reply, "culpable homicide" is used in Scottish law.
Feebs11As you will see in my earlier reply, "culpable homicide" is used in Scottish law.
I was referrring to the whole phrase 'culpable homicide not amounting to murder'. Is this phrase used in America or the UK?
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Hi,

I've never heard it.

Clive
Yoong Liat
Feebs11As you will see in my earlier reply, "culpable homicide" is used in Scottish law.
I was referrring to the whole phrase 'culpable homicide not amounting to murder'. Is this phrase used in America or the UK?
Sorry - no.

A Google search indicates that the phrase is one used in India and the Far East. No US or UK hits (apart from media reports)
Feebs11
Yoong Liat
Feebs11As you will see in my earlier reply, "culpable homicide" is used in Scottish law.
I was referrring to the whole phrase 'culpable homicide not amounting to murder'. Is this phrase used in America or the UK?
Sorry - no.

A Google search indicates that the phrase is one used in India and the Far East. No US or UK hits (apart from media reports)
I presume it is wrong usage; it is Singaporean English.
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Actually, I don't think so. The Google search showed that there is a murder charge called this in the Indian legal structure, and it may well be the same in Singapore.
Feebs11Actually, I don't think so. The Google search showed that there is a murder charge called this in the Indian legal structure, and it may well be the same in Singapore.
But Indian English is not recognised, right? Neither is Singapore English. I think I would accept AmE, BrE or Australian English.
What exactly are you looking for? Your student asked about the difference between homicide and murder, and that has been clearly answered. As to the phrase you are questioning, legal terms for criminal acts vary from one country to another. In India, this phrase seems to be a correct legal term for a crime. It may also be one that is used in Singapore. It is not necessarily a question of inaccurate local English.
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Feebs11A Google search indicates that the phrase is one used in India and the Far East. No US or UK hits (apart from media reports)
Hi all,

Sorry, I know this is off topic but I really couldn't find a better opportunity to ask this question. Is the word one a typo, or was it intended to be used here? Thank you.

Best wishes,
Peaceblinkfriend
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