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(1) I hope to have met him by next year.
(2) I hoped to have met him. (I didn't meet him after all.)
(3) I hope to have met him at the dance party last week.

I think (1) and (2) are possible to say in English but (3) is not. Is it correct?
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Comments  
I think that all three are incorrect.
1. I think it's wrong, because you can't usually hope to have met, you hope to meet by next year.
2. I hoped to meet him, but I didn't after all.
2. Wrong, you cannot hope about past events.
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Hi Marius,

Can you explain how sentence #1 appears okay to you?
Neeraj JainHi Marius,

Can you explain how sentence #1 appears okay to you?
Read again.
I think (1) and (2) are possible to say in English but (3) is not. Is it correct?
Yes. That's correct.

(1)
I hope to have written all three letters by midnight.
I hope to have finished these tasks by Sunday.
I hope to have learned the irregular verbs by next month.


All can be expressed with the simple infinitive, of course: hope to write, hope to finish, hope to learn.

(2)
I hoped to have written the letters by now, but unfortunately I was not able to.
etc.

These, too, can be expressed with the simple infinitive: hoped to write, etc.

(3)
Impossible. Hoping is always directed toward the future. You can't hope for something in the past.

I hope that I was born, for example, is completely anomalous.

CJ
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Hi!

Howabout those sentences?

I hoped that he would come.

I hoped that you were with us at the meeting. = I wish you had been there at the meeting with us.

If the above two examples are correct, then HOPE can be used with -ED to talk about things you wished in the past.
I hoped that you were with us at the meeting. = I wish you had been there at the meeting with us.
No. The two are not equivalent. The first is ungrammatical.

You need something like this:

I hope that you will be with us at the meeting.
I hoped that you would be with us at the meeting.
I hope that you have attended the meeting.
I hoped that you had attended the meeting.

CJ
You need something like this:

1. I hope that you will be with us at the meeting.
2. I hoped that you would be with us at the meeting.
3. I hope that you have attended the meeting.
4. I hoped that you had attended the meeting.


Thanks Cali! I would like to focus on the past use of hope, which is hoping something happened in the past.

Correct me if I am wrong please.

1=3

2=4
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