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Bob Cunningham filted:
About the subject line: I greatly dislike it when I write a meaningful subject line and then see it used ... subject line "Hortense", chatting about everything from baked apples to the weather in North Dakota, I could not care less.

ObAUE: don't you mean you could care less?...r
( . . . )
About the subject line: I greatly dislike it when I ... the weather in North Dakota, I could not care less.

It's a hormoanal problem.

But is it a genuwhine hormoanal problem?
Pay her, she'll relax.

Congratulations, John. I tried to think of something to do with "*** tense", but nothing came ... not even Hortense.
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If we now have a thread of 400 postings under ... the weather in North Dakota, I could not care less.

It would be ironic if there were 400 on-topic postings on the subject of "Hortense".

We could try. It would be something to do.
Have there been any great Hortenses in history? I mean, besides Matti?
It would be ironic if there were 400 on-topic postings on the subject of "Hortense".

We could try. It would be something to do. Have there been any great Hortenses in history? I mean, besides Matti?

Well, there was my mother, but I may well be biased.

Bob
It would be ironic if there were 400 on-topic postings on the subject of "Hortense".

We could try. It would be something to do. Have there been any great Hortenses in history? I mean, besides Matti?

"Hortensia" is what the Dutch call the hydrangea, so I looked up why. It turns out that Hortense de Beauharnais, daughter of the Empress Josephine and the step-daughter of Napoleon Bonaparte, was Queen of Holland, too. She also gave her name to one of the world's largest diamonds.
398 to go.

Best Donna Richoux
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About the subject line: I greatly dislike it when I write a meaningful subject line and then see it used ... subject line "Hortense", chatting about everything from baked apples to the weather in North Dakota, I could not care less.

I rather like the "Hortense" subject line. It reminds me of an old Archie comic book, wherein a girl named Hortense a shy, unattractive young lady was asked for a date to a dance by none other than Jughead an unattractive guy who was ahead of his time, being already dumbed down.
As a name, "Hortense" is dreadful, of course. A "Hortense" cannot escape being called "***" and is, whorish or not, often considered "horse-like." I think "Hortense" in the Archie comic had a rather long, horsey face.
On the whole, I'm glad to have the name I do. If I were a guy, I wouldn't want to be named ""(1) (sorry to the Richards here) or "Les." I also would not want to be named "Adolph." I once worked for a Jewish man, who was born some time in the early 1920s and whose first name was "Adolph." He didn't use it in everyday life, but he didn't go to the trouble or expense of legally changing it. Thus, there is was, any time he had to affix his official, legal name to anything.

(1) When I was in high school (late 1950s), "" used to be a perfectly acceptable name, not subject to anatomy-type jokes, at least not openly. If there were jokes being made, most of the girls were not privy to them. Sometimes I long for those innocent days. (Note that I didn't say "happy days." They weren't, not especially.)

Maria Conlon
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Maria Conlon filted:
On the whole, I'm glad to have the name I do. If I were a guy, I wouldn't want to be named ""(1) (sorry to the Richards here) or "Les." I also would not want to be named "Adolph."

Consider "Ronald"...with Colman fast fading in cultural significance, there were two possible role models for me growing up in California in the 1960s: a hamburger clown and a B-movie actor turned politician...(and whichever one I chose to emulate, I'd have to dye my hair orange)..

Your surname, Maria, has afforded a bit of public amusement to at least one person...last week "Schickele Mix" repeated a program in which the jazz/classical fusion of composer Conlon Nancarrow was featured...the host spent some time wondering what the original name was that must have been anagrammed to form that...he finally settled on a Christmas song written in honor of an old piece of artillery, the "Worn Cannon Carol"..r
It would be ironic if there were 400 on-topic postings on the subject of "Hortense".

We could try. It would be something to do. Have there been any great Hortenses in history? I mean, besides Matti?

Serendipity and Hortense have led me to stumble upon a Web site I've been wanting to find: one that tells where first names have come from. The site is at
http://www.behindthename.com / . There are 27 internal links, most of which sound like they could be useful or fun. For example, I find that "Robert" in Finnish is
PERTTI (m) ROOPE (m) ROOPERTTI (m)
And in the period 1920-1929 Robert was the most popular name for boys, with John, James, and William not far behind; Charles, George, and Joseph were only about half as popular. Wylie was in last (994th) place.
Hortense was 567th in the list of girls' names. An anagram of Hortense is Noethers.
It doesn't give any namesakes for Hortense, but for Robert it has
Namesakes for Robert:
Shakespearian Characters: 3 characters
Kings of the Franks and France: 2 kings
Nobel Prize Winners: 6 physics, 6 chemistry, 4 medicine, 1 peace, 5 economics
Oscar Award Winners: 4 directors, 3 actors
Saints: 12 saints, 7 blessed
Kings and Queens of Scotland: 3 kings
Sports Stars: 1 baseball, 8 basketball
I guess it doesn't count Bobby under Robert, because I can already think of sports stars Bobby Bonds and Bobby Jones without even trying hard.
It has
HORTENSE f French
Pronounced: or-TAWNS
French feminine form of Hortensius (see HORTENSIA).

HORTENSIA f Ancient Roman, English, Spanish
Feminine form of the Roman family name Hortensius, possibly derived from Latin hortus "garden".
And possibly not?
MATTI m Finnish
Finnish form of MATTHEW
MATTHEW m English, Biblical
Pronounced: MATH-yoo
English form of Matthaios, which was a Greek form
of the Hebrew name Mattithyahu which meant "gift
of YAHWEH". Saint Matthew, also called Levi, was
one of the twelve apostles (a tax collector). He
was supposedly the author of the first Gospel in
the New Testament.
It also has "© Mike Campbell 1996-2001. You may not reprint or redisplay this material without my permission."

But I plead fair use, your honor. Besides, I'm illustrating and advertising what a great site it is. Mike Campbell should thank me.
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"Hortensia" is what the Dutch call the hydrangea, so I looked up why. It turns out that Hortense de Beauharnais, ... of Napoleon Bonaparte, was Queen of Holland, too. She also gave her name to one of the world's largest diamonds.

Hmm... OED says "hortensia" was named after "the wife of J.-A. Lepaute (1720-c1787), French clockmaker". First used by P. Commerson in 1789.

Some discussion on fr.lettres.langue.francaise here: Removed)

Either way, it seems like an awfully convenient name for a flower, since "Hortensia" comes from Latin hortensi(u)s 'of or belonging to a garden' (f. hortus 'garden').
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