+0
Can I say,

(a) Last Sunday was a hot and stuffy afternoon.

(b) Last Sunday was hot and stuffy afternoon.

(c) Last Sunday was a hot and stuffy.
1 2
Comments  
Hi,

Can I say,

(a) Last Sunday was a hot and stuffy afternoon. No. Sunday is not an afternoon. Say 'Last Sunday, it was hot and stuffy in the afternoon' or 'Last Sunday afternoon, it was hot and stuffy'.

(b) Last Sunday was hot and stuffy afternoon. See my comment above.

(c) Last Sunday was a hot and stuffy. No, not grammatical. But you could say 'Last Sunday was hot and stuffy'.

Best wishes, Clive
Can I say,

(a) Last Sunday was a hot and stuffy day.

Thanks!
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Vincent Teo
Can I say,

(a) Last Sunday was a hot and stuffy day.

Thanks!

Yes, you sure can.
Can I say,

(a) Last Sunday was a hot and stuffy day in the afternoon.

(b) Yesterday, it was a hot and stuffy afternoon.
Can I say,

(a) Last Sunday was a hot and stuffy day in the afternoon.

(b) Yesterday, it was a hot and stuffy afternoon.

a is probably grammatically okay but not idiomatic. Last Sunday, it got hot and stuffy in the afternoon. Last Sunday afternoon was very hot and stuffy.

b has the same problem that was mentioned before. Yesterday consisted of more than just the afternoon. Yesterday, it was hot and stuffy in the afternoon. Yesterday, the afternoon was hot and stuffy.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
For some reason, I'm having a bit of a problem with the word "stuffy" being used to describe outdoor weather; I think of it as a description of indoor climate conditions. Does anyone else agree that "still", "stifling" or "sultry" might be better choices, depending on the exact conditions?
You're right - we do tend to say "stuffy" about the air indoors. Maybe muggy?
Can I say,

(a) On a hot and stuffy afternoon, he went out to buy a cope of ice cream.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more