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"Hot dog" has become for me the generic name for the sausage in question. When I was young, we called ... cup-up hot dogs in sauce which is referred to as "franks and beans" has had an effect on my usage.

As a semi-relevant aside, in the Philadelphia area it is common to clip "hot dog" to merely "dog". I would only use this when buying a prepared hot dog, such as at the ballpark or from a street vendor. I wouldn't use when when buying a package of hot dogs at the supermarket. But since I virtually never buy packages of hot dogs, I'm not sure if this is a general rule.
Richard R. Hershberger
And yes, a hot dog is not a sausage, because different kinds of sausagesare used some use frankfurters, some use vienna sausages and so on.

This explanation is unclear to me. If sausages are ground meats packed into an edible skin, and a hot dog is made by the same process, then a hot dog is a type of sausage. If I go to a street vendor, in point of fact, the difference between a hot dog and a hot sausage is:

a. size
b. flavor
Joanne
(who doesn't quite believe she is having this debate)
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I think you are right that most sausage in the US contains pork, so pork-free sausage will tend to be so specified.

In Chicago it is always all beef.
When I Googled "hot dog world's fair", I came across several claims to the invention and name.
http://www.whatscookingamerica.net/History/HotDog/HDIndex.htm
I make sausages as a hobby and frankfurters are indeed sausages. Curiously, the two most involved types of sausage to make are wieners and bologna (the two most common and plainest meats in the US). Wieners are made by stuffing the ground meat into casing, smoking it, cooking it and then peeling the casing back off, so they are skinless. They are traditionally a mixture of pork, beef and sometimes include chicken or turkey, but they can be purchased in an "all beef" version as well.
Here in Missouri, "hot dog" can be used to refer to either the sandwich or the sausage. We also occasionally abbreviate it to "dog" when referring to the sandwich. The sausage is also called a "wiener". We are aware of the term "frank" or "frankfurter", but these terms are seldom if ever used. When the sandwich is topped with chili, the "hot" is truncated and it is called a "chili dog".

The bun here is called a "bun", never a "roll"; Rolls are what you eat with dinner. The package that they come in at the grocery store is labeled "Hot Dog Buns".
Don
Kansas City
eromlignod filted:
The bun here is called a "bun", never a "roll"; Rolls are what you eat with dinner. The package that they come in at the grocery store is labeled "Hot Dog Buns".

If ever a phrase called for a clarifying hyphen, that would be it..r
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Here in England it's impossible to find an unsmoked wiener these days. :-(

Does that mean you have all switched from cigarettes?

I wish.
I note (reference another thread some months? weeks? ago) predictions (that I have not checked) that within 10 years obesity will annually kill as many people as smoking does. These predictions are UK and US, definitely not Scandinavia. (Damn. I had two verbless sentences here, and I just couldn't leave them in.)
Also, we may all note predictions that today's teenagers will have shorter lifespans than their parents, for the first time in anyone's memory.

And, though you may not note it, I always note that scare stories grab readers and viewers and all of this may be total nonsense and totally unrelated to reality. For all I surely know, there may not even be American soldiers in Iraq. It may all be a cynical plot to sell pickup trucks and allow intrusive searches of me every time I go through an airport (and I have no idea why that is desired).
Jon Miller
U¿ytkownik "Joanne Marinelli @att.net>" napisa³ w wiadomo¶ci
This explanation is unclear to me. If sausages are ground meats packedinto an edible skin, and a hot dog is ... vendor, in point of fact, the difference between a hot dog and a hot sausage is: a. size b. flavor

I suppose you have never had Polish sausage ;-)The difference is also in the ingredients and the preparation method. According to Polish standards, sausage is a product that must contain at least 60-70% (I don't remember exactly) of (quality) meat the rest is fat and spices. Sausage may not contain other ingredients, especially ingredients that would adulterate it in any way. Hotdog "sausages" as you call them (actually no-one in Poland would call the meat component of a hot dog a sausage Emotion: wink))) contain anything but meat.

I mean it - among their ingredients are fibres, tendons, cartilage, skin, bones, and some lowest quality meat (some say even hair is added - no-one cares as everything is finely ground). The difference in the preparation method is also quite central: unlike wiener ingredients, meat for sausage is ground rather coarsely and it stays quite "integrated". Then, sausage can be smoked, fried, roasted, grilled or boiled. Wieners can be boiled or grilled, but not really fried or roasted (the only country where I saw fried wieners was the UK;-)).
So the difference between sausage proper and "hot dog sausage(s)" is rather huge. I know this may look different in the US or in the UK, but since we have a global market now, you may well come across Polish sausage in your supermarket around the corner.
Kamil
is

a type of sausage. If I go to a street ... dog and a hot sausage is: a. size b. flavor

I suppose you have never had Polish sausage ;-) The difference is also in the ingredients and the preparation method. ... we have a global market now, you may well come across Polish sausage in your supermarket around the corner. Kamil

There are sausages of every type imaginable in the U.S.A. from very high quality ones made in small deli's to "parts is parts" ones made in factories. As Otto Von Bismarck observed{and Churchill plagiarized}law and sausage are easier to enjoy when one doesn't see how they are made.
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is

a type of sausage. If I go to a street ... dog and a hot sausage is: a. size b. flavor

I suppose you have never had Polish sausage ;-) The difference is also in the ingredients and the preparation method. ... we have a global market now, you may well come across Polish sausage in your supermarket around the corner. Kamil[/nq]Just as you can find "Swiss cheese" in a supermarket in the US without any of it having been imported from Switzerland, you can find "Polish sausage" in such a supermarket without any of it having been imported from Poland. For us, "Polish sausage" is a type of sausage, like "Italian sausage," or "bratwurst," or "knockwurst." Perhaps Don of Kansas City, Missouri, who makes sausages as a hobby, could identify the difference between these Polish sausage and other types of sausages.

I could tell you only that the meat in Polish sausage is course ground and they are paler. In length, Polish sausages are straight and are suitable to serve bun, while something like kielbasa comes in a long form (typically sold in the shape of a U) which is curved. On those relatively rare occasions when I buy Polish sausage, it is a national brand: Johnsonville brand Polish sausages.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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