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According to the below site, they are no longer in production. Don't buy those that might still be on the shelves. http://www.hometownfavorites.com/shop/btwgb.asp

Just a quick perusal didn't turn up a couple of my childhood favorites:

Bosco "milk amplifier" chocolate syrup
Malt-O-Meal (some kind of cereal?)
Py-o-my (maybe Pie-o-my) some kind of pudding mix. It was touted on a local (SFO) TV program called Fireman Frank. Well, poor Frank ate so much of it that he became "firehouse" Frank and the station let him go, to be replaced by ultra skinny George Lemont.
Maybe Skitt remembers these things?
-YJ
When I was a teenager there was a scandal that the hot dogs served in the high school cafeteria (in ... but powdered paper sounds like an urban legend. The paper would make the weenies a good source of dietary fiber.

Not when it's been bleached like that. At this point it's totally worthless and passes through the body virtually untouched. The problem might be that some of it might be small enough to get absorbed into the system and later cause organ damage.
-YJ
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
A Google search shows other products which use "food-grade cellulose."

Food grade must mean pine instead of mahogany, and no knots.

No naughty pine for naughty kids?
Fork split means you split them at home with a fork.
I don't remember it smelling like burning wood when toasted, but I do remember that it tasted dry.

Did you ever toast it?

I don't know. Nowadays, I almost always toast bread, but I don't remember if I did back then.
I mentioned in another post that the US federal government requiresall-beef hot dogs to be labeled "beef franks" on the package and Hebrew National's

Does this rule only apply to all-beef? I mean do all meat hot dogs ahve to be called meat franks? Do hot dogs in general have to be called franks on the package. (Maybe it's because the buns are not included?)

No, the Web page I quoted in another post appeared to indicate that the word "franks" had to be used in the package label if the hot dog in question was made from one meat ("beef franks," "turkey franks"), but that "hot dog" or "frankfurter" or "wiener" could be used if the hot dog consisted of a mix of meats. Here's that link again:
See
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/focushotdog.htm

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
In all my recipes for frankfurters (a German sausage) the ... "kosher". Perhaps there are a lot of Jews in Chicago?

Not really, though erk might claim otherwise. No more than there are a lot of Italians in Chicago. Regardless of ... 110,000 Montreal 100,000 St. Petersburg (Russia) 100,000 They don't list Baltimore, but it can't be too far down, no?

The figures for Boston include the whole metropolitan area and not just Boston proper .
25,000 Jews actually living in the city limits is probably closer to the mark, most left the city in the 70's for suburbs south of the city and large numbers reside in the city of Newton and the town of Brookline.
According to the below site, they are no longer in production. Don'tbuy those that might still be on the shelves. http://www.hometownfavorites.com/shop/btwgb.asp

Just a quick perusal didn't turn up a couple of my childhood favorites: Bosco "milk amplifier" chocolate syrup Malt-O-Meal (some kind of cereal?)

Malt-O-Meal is still around. My guess is that you're thinking of Malt-O-Meal "Original Hot Wheat Cereal." See
http://www.malt-o-meal.com/PRODUCTS.HTM
In recent years, the company has gotten into budget cereals in a big way, the kind that are sold in plastic bags and are generic versions of nationally known boxed cereals.
Py-o-my (maybe Pie-o-my) some kind of pudding mix. It was touted on a local (SFO) TV program called Fireman Frank. ... and the station let him go, to be replaced by ultra skinny George Lemont. Maybe Skitt remembers these things? -YJ

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
You know, in many areas of the country what we call a chili dog is called "chili size" on restaurant menus.

I thought that was just a Californism.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
And this reminds of why certain brands of (American) English ... Ricardo working on the candy assembly line ages ago. -YJ

Fork split means you split them at home with a fork.

There are indeed brands of English muffin which save you the trouble, by doing the fork splitting for you it isn't done simply with a knife, because the result is a rough surface, like that which results when you fork-split at home. Unfortunately, it is often necessary with these "fork-split" muffins at least with the cheaper brands to use a knife to completely separate the halves of the muffin.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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