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They gave him a little piece of raw meat. Rikki-tikki liked it immensely, and when it was finished he went out into the veranda and sat in the sunshine and fluffed up his fur to make it dry to the roots.

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hendrix7 How many adverbs are there in this sentence?

I see at least one. How many did you find? Can you name the one or more that you found?

CJ

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CalifJimI see at least one.

I also see at least one. ounting things also means defining what you are looking for.

One definition of an adverb describes "one word" but some other definitions accept "a word or phrase".

The number that you give for an answer depends on the definition that you are using. So which one is it?

Well, to me, the obvious one is 'immensely' but I believe 'out' (in phrase 'went out'), 'in' (in phrase 'in sunshine'), 'when' (in phrase 'when it was finished') and 'up' (in phrase 'fluffed up') are also adverbs as they all modify verbs in the passage. Just wanted other opinions.

As far as I'm aware, an adverb is one word and an adverbial phrase is more than one word. Is that not correct?

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hendrix7

As far as I'm aware, an adverb is one word and an adverbial phrase is more than one word. Is that not correct?

Yes. Both are adverbials.

An adverb is one word. Clauses and phrases can be adverbials.

hendrix7

Well, to me, the obvious one is 'immensely' but I believe 'out' (in phrase 'went out'), 'in' (in phrase 'in sunshine'), 'when' (in phrase 'when it was finished') and 'up' (in phrase 'fluffed up') are also adverbs as they all modify verbs in the passage. Just wanted other opinions.

I count 'immensely' as definitely an adverb.
I count 'out' as maybe an adverb or maybe a "particle" of a phrasal verb (to go out). It depends on the method of grammatical analysis you use. There's also 'up' (to fluff up).

I don't think any method of analysis counts 'in' or 'when' as an adverb in that sentence.

CJ