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Hello everyone! A real quick, easy one for you...

1. Having a career in math would be a dream come true.

Simple enough, right? You've got what I believe to be a gerund-participial (or at least that is what the CGEL seems to suggest) followed by "would be," a sort of future, hypothetical, hopeful verb construction (I don't know the technical name for it), and, of course, the complement "a dream come true."

2. Simply having a career in math would be a dream come true.

What do we call this construction now that we've put an adverb in front of it? Is it still a gerund-participial? It's not an adverbial phrase. Thoughts?

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Mr DWhat do we call this construction now that we've put an adverb in front of it? Is it still a gerund-participial?

I don't see why not. The phrase 'in math' doesn't disqualify it as a gerund-participial, so I can't see why 'simply' would.

On the other hand, you're viewing it through the prism of CGEL, so all bets are off.

CJ

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Mr D CGEL

It's more useful to refer to the names of the authors (Huddleston and Pullum) or add the date (CGEL (2002)) than just write CGEL , which could refer to:

Quirk et al, (1985) A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (1985), London: Longman

Huddleston and Pullum (2002), The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, Cambridge: CUP

That's very, very true.