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Hi,
where is the main stress in that expression? When I was in school, my teachers always said "How are you?" (stress on "you"). I think I hear "How are you?" most of the times, and that should be the correct one (since pronouns are not usually stressed). However, sometimes I also hear "How are you?", and not as an answer (where you would stress the pronoun, since you want to know about the other).

Any comments? Thank you Emotion: smile
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Comments  
Both are acceptable. "How are you*?" is most common, "How *are* ya?" is a little less formal, but "How *are you" if you overemphasize the "are" sounds a little pompous.
Marvin A.Both are acceptable. "How are you*?" is most common, "How *are* ya?" is a little less formal, but "How *are you" if you overemphasize the "are" sounds a little pompous.
Hi,
really? I really thought it was "How are you?" that was most common. But if "How are you?" is possible and common, then it is an exception, isn't it? I mean, when you say "Who is she?", isn't the stress on "is"? I learned that pronouns are not stressed, unless you need to stress it for some reason... So "How are you?" should be an exception...
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Hmm I normally heard people say how are you as well.

Though, my native American friend told me it doesn't really matter how you stress it. Just depends on the situation, you can even stress any word you want >_> if it is needed.

Also, in one of the pronunciation book I have, there is this exercise on stressing:

I didn't say he stole the money. Someone else said it.

I didn't say he stole the money. That's not true at all.

I didn't say he stole the money. I only suggested the possiblity.

I didn't say he stole the money. I think someone else took it.

I didn't say he stole the money. Maybe he just borrowed it.

I didn't say he stole the money, but rather some other money.

I didn't say he stole the money. He maybe have taken some jewelry.

Quoted from P. 10 American Accent Training

I think this quote able kinda describes this situation here as well. You can stress any of those words on the sentence just depends on what you want to mean.

I hope that is not offtopic LOL
Hi Yuki,
thank you for your opinion.
L.YukiHmm I normally heard people say how are you as well.

Though, my native American friend told me it doesn't really matter how you stress it. Just depends on the situation, you can even stress any word you want >_> if it is needed.
I asked a native speaker too, and she said that "How are you?" would be something you say after someone has already asked you "How are you?" So she said "How are you?" is not ok as a general question when you meet someone.
L.YukiAlso, in one of the pronunciation book I have, there is this exercise on stressing:
I didn't say he stole the money.
Hey, I remember that "I didn't say he stole the money". I have that book too! Emotion: wink (American Accent Training).
But if you remember what the author says, she says that "pronouns" are usually not stressed, unless there is a reason to stress them. For example, you say "Thank you", not "Thank you", unless it is a reply to another "Thank you" and you stress "you".
I love you. (default) I love you. (you, not another one)
Why don't you come with me? (default) Why don't you come with me? (me, not another one)
How are you? (default or not?) How are you? (is this an exception then?)

She said you don't stress pronouns unless there is a good reason. What is the good reason for saying:
Mike: Hi, how are you?
John: Fine. What about you?

Emotion: smile

Ah, I see. That is why I hate stressing -_- I can't stress well.

I don't think I am that far yet. I am just on the beginning of the book LOL

Now that mention "Thank you", I think it is the same case as what the native speaker (your friend) has mentioned. Because as a cashier at times, I always say "Thank you" to the customers. And at times, I will get a "Thank you" back. Thanks for the reference. I didn't even notice.

I know what would be a good reason for saying:
Mike: Hi, how are you?
John: Fine. What about you?
cough to be offensive to someone.

Just kidding Emotion: crying

By the way, is there any chance you understand the "rubber band" method. I am so confused at it I never use it. And got no response from their Yahoo group either.
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L.YukiAh, I see. That is why I hate stressing -_- I can't stress well.
I can't either, I just pretend I know what to stress, LOL. Really, I think it is difficult, I just try not to think to much about what to stress... I think I'll learn over time, little by little, just listening... If I started to think how to pronounce every sound perfectly, where to put the stress, what to say, how to say it... I would go crazy in half a second! LOL
L.YukiNow that mention "Thank you", I think it is the same case as what the native speaker (your friend) has mentioned. Because as a cashier at times, I always say "Thank you" to the customers. And at times, I will get a "Thank you" back. Thanks for the reference. I didn't even notice.
It seems you are in the US... You're so lucky, you're gonna learn so fast! Emotion: wink
L.YukiBy the way, is there any chance you understand the "rubber band" method. I am so confused at it I never use it. And got no response from their Yahoo group either.
I didn't do everything she told me to do. I read most of the book, but I never even tried that "rubber band" method. Also, all that stuff about stress and intonation, it's a lot of stuff. As I said above, if I started to think about all that stuff every time I open my mouth, I would go crazy. I believe stress and intonation can be improved over time... But I read the part about pronunciation very carefully. Learning how sounds are connected and reduced when talking fast really helped me a lot. That's all. Emotion: smile
>> I asked a native speaker too, and she said that "How are you?" would be something you say after someone has already asked you "How are you?" So she said "How are you?" is not ok as a general question when you meet someone. <<

Hmm. Actually I retract what I said before. The native speaker that you asked is right--you do stress the "you" after someone had already asked you the question. However, I do not agree that you stress the "are" when you originally ask the question. After considering it for awhile, I believe that all three words get about equal weight. Many non-native speakers have sounded peculiar when they put too much emphasis on the "are". Try to say all three words with equal stress.
I've read this thread several times, and it's puzzling.

How are you? gets the same normal downward falling intonation and stress at the end as any other content question. I don't sense a really emphatic stress on you, just the same as at the end of any question of the same type. In fact, I think I hear it as very nearly the way Marvin describes it - equal throughout -, though I hear a little more emphasis on you at the end, and a bit of stress on How. I don't see it as an exception. I think you can forget about the don't-stress-a-pronoun stuff. That makes no sense here. It may be the weak verb to be that blocks the don't-stress-a-pronoun "rule".

How are you? How is he? Who is she? Is she with you?
Was it for them? Was it because of us? Where were you?

Emphasizing the weak verb to be, especially when there's a how or where in the question, seems to project a sense of excessive concern which borders on the precious. I think women are better at carrying off that shade of meaning. It doesn't sound right when men say it that way. (Just my exaggerated opinion. I could be wrong here. I'll probably get hate mail over this!)

Where were you? (I was so, so, so worried when I couldn't find you!!!)
How are you? (I really, really hope you are just fine!!!)

CJ
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