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Hello everyone,
sorry for my late message, but I haven't been online for quite a while. Thanks for the lots of answers I received, now I have some basis to work with! Emotion: smile

Thomas
Seldomly? Like, the opposite of oftenly?

The adverb is listed in the OED as rare. Although seldomly used, no less than the wonderful Emily Dickinson wrote, "The ships...That touch how seldomly Thy Shore?".

I alwaysly bow to Emily.
Mike.
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The adverb is listed in the OED as rare. Although ... Emily Dickinson wrote, "The ships...That touch how seldomly Thy Shore?".

I alwaysly bow to Emily.

I'd like to as oftenly as I once did, but I haven't found her complete poems for less than about £80. The volume, or a similar one, was the price of a song when I was young.

Charles Riggs
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I alwaysly bow to Emily.

I'd like to as oftenly as I once did, but I haven't found her complete poems for less than about £80. The volume, or a similar one, was the price of a song when I was young.

Eighty bloody quid? There's no price in my one-volume Gramercy edition, apparently a facsimile of the three original published volumes, but it dates from 1982, and I can't imagine I paid more than a tenner for it. Not for sale, I'm afraid.
But hold! I sense the birth-pangs of a wholly new and deeply irritating sentence-adverb: the linguistics crowd will love it if the educated classes get together and hate it properly. Scrub last sentence, para 1! Replace with:
Afraidly, it's not for sale.
Mike.
Thus spake Mike Lyle:
I'd like to as oftenly as I once did, but ... was the price of a song when I was young.

Eighty bloody quid? There's no price in my one-volume Gramercy edition, apparently a facsimile of the three original published volumes, but it dates from 1982, and I can't imagine I paid more than a tenner for it. Not for sale, I'm afraid.

Dickinson is in the public domain and on the Internet, which means you can download it yourself, edit it for format, print it out, bind it, and sell it at a fraction of the cost.

Thank God for AOL, that's what I say.
But hold! I sense the birth-pangs of a wholly new and deeply irritating sentence-adverb: the linguistics crowd will love it if the educated classes get together and hate it properly. Scrub last sentence, para 1! Replace with: Afraidly, it's not for sale.

Backward I see in my own days where I sweated through fog with linguists and contenders;
I have no mockings or arguments—I witness and wait.

Walt Whitman "Song of Myself" 4: 72f.

Simon R. Hughes
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I'd like to as oftenly as I once did, but ... was the price of a song when I was young.

Eighty bloody quid?

Even worse, I see after checking my Amazon Wish List: eighty-six bloody quid, plus 50 *** pence. As if that's not bad enough, they have the effrontery to add on another £1.99 because they say it is hard to find! Harder for me to find the money I'll betcha, but I'll have it sooner or later, irregardlessly.
There's no price in my one-volume Gramercy edition, apparently a facsimile of the three original published volumes, but it dates from 1982, and I can't imagine I paid more than a tenner for it. Not for sale, I'm afraid.

About what I paid for mine in the US, and it was also complete. This one is a three-volume Harvard University Press edition. Amazon.co.uk lists nothing else that is even close to being complete, and the US Amazon doesn't even list the Harvard one.
I could probably find it for less somewhere, but I am not a shopper.
But hold! I sense the birth-pangs of a wholly new and deeply irritating sentence-adverb: the linguistics crowd will love it if the educated classes get together and hate it properly. Scrub last sentence, para 1! Replace with: Afraidly, it's not for sale.

Hopefully, I won't be forced to steal it from you.
Charles Riggs
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and replace with eir
Thus spake Mike Lyle:

Eighty bloody quid? There's no price in my one-volume Gramercy ... than a tenner for it. Not for sale, I'm afraid.

Dickinson is in the public domain and on the Internet, which means you can download it yourself, edit it for format, print it out, bind it, and sell it at a fraction of the cost.

What a lovely pleasant-to-take-to-bed edition that would make. No thank you.
Thank God for AOL, that's what I say.

Poor Emily must be rolling in her grave.
But hold! I sense the birth-pangs of a wholly new ... sentence, para 1! Replace with: Afraidly, it's not for sale.

Backward I see in my own days where I sweated through fog with linguists and contenders; I have no mockings or arguments—I witness and wait. Walt Whitman "Song of Myself" 4: 72f.

My version has a comma after "arguments" instead of some pissant, meaningless symbol, but then I read poems the old-fashioned way.
Charles Riggs
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Thus spake Mike Lyle: Backward I see in my own ... and wait. Walt Whitman "Song of Myself" 4: 72f.

My version has a comma after "arguments" instead of some pissant, meaningless symbol, but then I read poems the old-fashioned way.

But you never quite know with Walt. (I see, btw, a hyphen in the posting as posting, and a question mark in the posting quoted in the response form. Perhaps Walt's spirit likes to revise Google now and then.) My Norton Critical Edition has the comma, but there the lines are 80f. It retains, presumably as a bonus, the misprint 64 "...show me to a cent" for "...show to me a cent".
I wonder if a later author's line, "I coulda been a contender", was actually an undetected typo for "I coulda been a linguist"?

Mike.
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My version has a comma after "arguments" instead of some pissant, meaningless symbol, but then I read poems the old-fashioned way.

But you never quite know with Walt. (I see, btw, a hyphen in the posting as posting, and a question mark in the posting quoted in the response form. Perhaps Walt's spirit likes to revise Google now and then.)

Knowing Walt, he'd have something uplifting to say about the Internet, including, even, Donna's Google. I saw an ugly rectangle in Simon's post, where a comma ought to have been. Then it got changed, with your response to my response, to a question mark. Strange days.
Charles Riggs
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