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Could you help me correct these please?

1 How come the address on your passport is the same as the one on your utility bill?
2 The subtitles read off/read faster than the audio file so the two don't stay in sync very long.
3 While you are/were waiting, would you like to listen to music.
While you wait would you like to listen to music.

Thank you
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Comments  
Here are my corrections and suggestions. First, avoid "how come"--this is informal speech and should be avoided when writing.

1 How come the address on your passport is the same as the one on your utility bill?
Why is the address on your passport the same as the one on your utility bill?

2 The subtitles read off/read faster than the audio file so the two don't stay in sync very long.
(I don't think that "read" is the correct verb. People read; subtitles don't. You could say "can be read," but would cause new problems. Find a new verb.) The subtitles roll/appear faster than the audio file, so the two don't stay in sync very long.

3 While you are/were waiting, would you like to listen to music.
While you are waiting, would you like to listen to music? (Not "were" because this would place part of the action in the past and the rest in the present.)
While you wait would you like to listen to music.
While you wait, would you like to listen to music? (Add punctuation.)

Or: Would you like to listen to music while you wait?
Thank you doctor D,

I just had one question regarding reads off:

You know on the internet when you watch a movie, lets say on youtube.

The is a red line that has to load before you can actually watch the video, I think it's called the buffer data or something, and when the connection isn't great the red line doesn't load very fast. so how would you say the following please:

The video plays faster than it loads/ the video plays faster than the content can load/faster than the content/video loads, which is why it stops playing every now and then. The whole video has loaded yet.

How would you express this please?

Thank you
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alc24The video plays faster than it loads
This is a perfectly natural sentence. I would probably use a progressive ("The video is playing fater than it can load"), but that's just my preference.
alc24The whole video has loaded yet.
Careful, the word yet is a negative polarity item . It is not used in plain positive sentences. It needs to be with negation ("the video hasn't loaded yet"), in a question ("has the video loaded yet?"), or with non-affirming verbs ("I doubt the video had loaded yet").
BaldKingOfFranceCareful, the word yet is a negative polarity item. It is not used in plain positive sentences. It needs to be with negation ("the video hasn't loaded yet"), in a question ("has the video loaded yet?"), or with non-affirming verbs ("I doubt the video had loaded yet").
The ship sailed an hour ago, and I can see it yet.

The video plays faster than it loads”

This sounds illogical without bringing the buffer into the picture. Granted, some people will know what you're talking about.
AvangiThe ship sailed an hour ago, and I can see it yet.
That's not a grammatical sentence. Change to:
"That ship sailed an hour ago and I can see it still"
or
"That ship sailed an hour ago and I can't see it yet"

Those have different meanings, though. Depends what you want to say.

Edit: I should specify I'm a Canadian English speaker, and it's not grammatical for me.
Also, "The ship sailed an hour ago yet I can still see it" is a different use of "yet", which is not a negative polarity item. That one means "contrary to expectation". That's not the same thing as "yet" in "The video hasn't loaded yet", which is a negative polarity "yet".
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That's not a grammatical sentence.

"I can hear it yet." 77,300 Google hits, about a third at the end of a sentence.

(one I used to sing)
As I reach back in memory, I recall an old-time melody.
I can hear it yet by my old quartet, in the days that used to be.
(not one of my favorites, by any means.)

- Lou Perry, I believe

The devil is in the details - Ross Perot
Yeah, those sound completely wrong/archaic to me. I obviously can't deny that people use the word that way, but it's definitely not something that crosses dialects. Not to be obtuse, but I don't even know what "I can hear it yet" means. Is it the same as "I can hear it still"?
You have it.

My parents didn't use it that way either, but others of their generation did. I'll admit, the first time I heard it, it threw me. I remember the question: "Is your Uncle Ben in Springfield yet?" (meaning, "still.")
To the speaker, it was perfectly natural - and he was a college grad, where my parents were not.

But the song I quoted is not all that old.

Best regards, - A.

What's wrong with being obtuse?? Emotion: thinking
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