This is something I've always wondered about.
In an American dictionary the word "carver" is pronounced as

CAR-v&r
(The ampersand is a schwa). Both r's are clearly enunciated. This is how I pronounce it.
But British people tend to pronounce it as
CAH-vuh
With no audible r's. This seems to be true all the way up to British royalty. How does a British dictionary say to pronounce it? Does it indicate the latter pronunciation? If it indicates the former pronunciation, then why doesn't anyone in England pronounce it that way?

This isn't meant to be captious. I have just never seen a British dictionary and would be curious as to what the differences are. Please forgive me if this is a worn out subject here.
Don
Kansas City
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This is something I've always wondered about. In an American dictionary the word "carver" is pronounced as CAR-v&r (The ampersand is a schwa).

'Round here we use /@/ for a schwa; /&/ is an ash.
Both r's are clearly enunciated. This is how I pronounce it. But British people tend to pronounce it as CAH-vuh With no audible r's. This seems to be true all the way up to British royalty. How does a British dictionary say to pronounce it?

DJones15: /'kA:[email protected](r)/, US: /'kA:rvR/
SOED5 & OED2: /'kA:[email protected](r)/
COD10 and Chambers consider the pronunciation too obvious to waste ink and paper on.
Does it indicate the latter pronunciation? If it indicates the former pronunciation, then why doesn't anyone in England pronounce it ... would be curious as to what the differences are. Please forgive me if this is a worn out subject here.

It's a worn-out subject that many Respected Regulars nonetheless think is deathless, as deathless as the boring questions of the vowels in 'caught' and 'cot' or in 'merry', 'Mary', and 'marry.' Check the archives ( ) or the FAQs
(http://www.alt-usage-english.com) if you really want to know.
This is something I've always wondered about. In an American dictionary the word "carver" is pronounced as CAR-v&r (The ampersand ... way up to British royalty. How does a British dictionary say to pronounce it? Does it indicate the latter pronunciation?

Yes. Though the Rs are also included as an option, since Scots, etc., do pronounce them.
If it indicates the former pronunciation, then why doesn't anyone in England pronounce it that way?

It seems to me you're confusing how words are spelled with how they're pronounced.
Adrian
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
This is something I've always wondered about. In an American dictionary the word "carver" is pronounced as CAR-v&r (The ampersand ... way up to British royalty. How does a British dictionary say to pronounce it? Does it indicate the latter pronunciation?

My Chambers (1973) doesn't give pronunciation for "carver'. For "carve", it gives 'kärv'
If it indicates the former
pronunciation, then why doesn't anyone in England pronounce it that way?

You mean "why do most English people interpret letter combinations differently?"
This isn't meant to be captious. I have just never seen a British dictionary and would be curious as to what the differences are. Please forgive me if this is a worn out subject here.

Would you like to make up your mind whether you mean British or English? There are a number of English dialects which are rhotic. There are more if you include the whole of Britain.
Fran
Yes. Though the Rs are also included as an option, since Scots, etc., do pronounce them.

Very interesting. Thank you.
It seems to me you're confusing how words are spelled with how they're pronounced.

I'm not confusing or presuming anything. I'm just asking how the British dictionary says to pronounce the word. If you are pronouncing it like your dictionary says to, then you are certainly correct.

Where I'm from we usually pronounce as prescribed by the (American) dictionary, not because we're any sharper or more proper than anyone else in the US...we just got lucky, I guess. When people (Americans) say words that diverge from the standard dictionary pronunciation(s) I consider them a "mispronunciation". Why else would the dictionary print them?

Don
Kansas City
A good online source for BrE phonetics is Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary at , which uses IPA. For "carver", they have /'kA:[email protected](superscript r)/. The superscript r is the "linking r" of non-rhotic BrE, only pronounced before a following vowel.

CALD entry:
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/define.asp?dict=CALD&key=11681&ph=on FAQ on rhoticity, "linking r":
http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/fxrhotic.html Evan K's ASCII-ized IPA specification:
http://kirshenbaum.net/IPA/index.html
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
FAQ on rhoticity, "linking r": http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/fxrhotic.html

I noticed that doesn't mention that intrusive r's can even occur inside words, the classic example being "drawring" (I do it sometimes, but not always). Also, how many people use linking r's but not intrusive r's? And are there any rhotists that have intrusive r's?
This is something I've always wondered about. In an American dictionary the word "carver" is pronounced as CAR-v&r (The ampersand ... would be curious as to what the differences are. Please forgive me if this is a worn out subject here.

Ka:[email protected]
The a is in a non-serif fount.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Just for your information, the *Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary* at www.m-w.com and *Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary,* 11th ed., include pronunciations which are considered controversial for one reason or another, such as the three-syllable pronunciation of "pointsettia" (my preferred pronunciation, by the way). They precede those pronunciations with , the division sign, although for this purpose it's referred to as an obelus.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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