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How do I pronounce "Dude"? Are "Dyude" or "Dood" both valid or Only "Dood" is the right way of saying?

This question comes into my mind because words like "Stupid" is pronounced as "Styupid" in British Accent and "Stoopid" in American Accent.

Just curious to if it is applicable to this word as well, since I've heard many a times my friends yelling out "Dyude! Come here..!" etc... I believe "Dood" is the right way. But some says it can be pronounced as "Dyude" as well. I'm confused, please help...

/Sameer
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In American English it starts the same way as the verb DO.
DUDE = DOOD.
"Stupid" is STOOpid.
If you watch South Park you can hear the word "dude" several time in each episode.
Comments  
( dju:d)- this is the right pronouncation.
and du:d- it is the other meaning of these word but you need this one - dju:d
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Alinka( dju:d)- this is the right pronouncation.
and du:d- it is the other meaning of these word but you need this one - dju:d

It's not true. Actually both [dju:d] and [du:d] pronunciations are fine but the first one is British, while the second one is rather American.
well, you know that 'dude' is an American word
and if say du:d you mean the resident of the east part of the US
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Alinkawell, you know that 'dude' is an American word
and if say du:d you mean the resident of the east part of the US

Somebody must have told you lies. The pronunciation doesn't differ according to its meaning.

"Dude" is by now quite a universal word and it's used even outside of English speaking countries. You're wrong that [du:d] (I mean the pronunciation) refers only to an Easterner. It surely means also "man, chap" and this is the word's most frequent meaning. Watch some American movies and hear the way they pronounce it. And they don't mean "an Easterner" but simply "pal".

[Du:d] is generally American, while [dju:d] is British, but you cannot expect every American to say [du:d] and every Brit to say [dju:d]. It's just a generalisation.

Here's a link to a cool article I once read about the history of the word dude.