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Having sung an hymn, they went out. Could someone please tell me about this participial phrase?

How do you describe the tense implications of "having"? It has the feeling of past perfect tense, but it's obviously not.

Thank you kindly.
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Hi,

Having sung an hymn, they went out. Could someone please tell me about this participial phrase?

How do you describe the tense implications of "having"? It has the feeling of past perfect tense, but it's obviously not

It's a Perfect Participle. As with the Perfect tenses, it conveys the idea that an earlier event/activity has importance at a later time.
eg Having fallen off a cliff last month, he died yesterday.

Now let's consider your example.

Having sung a hymn, they went out. First they sang. Then they finished singing. Then they went out.

Singing a hymn, they went out. They were singing as they went out.

Best wishes, Clive
My try:

Having sung an hymn, they went out.

The sentence is from "After they had sung a hymn, they went out."
The event in the clause with the past perfect tense happens earlier than that with the past tense.

"Having sung a hymn, they went out"
"Having" play an important role in suggesting the temporal order of the two events.
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Thanks, Clive.

Is the perfect participle "Having," or "Having sung"?

Do we also use the expression "perfect participial phrase"?

If only the word "having" constitutes the perfect participle, are there others as well?

Rgdz, - A.
Hi Avangi

I'm a foreigner and therefore I see nothign exceptional in the sentence. Well, I would prefer to to say a hymn, but I do know than an is also used. When I was 15 years old, my English teacher taught me what he called 'clause equivalents', and your sentence fits his formula very well.

[After] having sung a hymn, they went out. = After singing a hymn, they went out.

'Having sung has been formed from the perfect infinitive - at least that's what I call it. In the grammatical terminology I use, it is called the perfect participle - but as grammatical terms vary from country to country, I wouldn't be surprised if somebody wanted to call it something else. No harm done. Everybody is right!

CB

EDIT: I think it's quite peculiar that I get an e-mail from this thread, which I never participated in - and yet I do not get notifications from many threads I have participated in!

CB
Thanks, exo.
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Hi,
Is the perfect participle "Having," or "Having sung"? Having sung

Do we also use the expression "perfect participial phrase"? Dunno. I don't see why you couldn't say that if you wanted to.

If only the word "having" constitutes the perfect participle, are there others as well?

Lots. Almost endless numbers.
Having sung, having cooked, having said, having driven, etc. etc.

Having written this, I will now post it.
Clive
Cool Breeze 'Having sung has been formed from the perfect infinitive
Hi, CB. Could you please give me a step-by-step on this? Thanks. - A.
Avangi
Cool Breeze 'Having sung has been formed from the perfect infinitive
Hi, CB. Could you please give me a step-by-step on this? Thanks. - A.

Present active infinitive: (to) sing. Present active participle: singing.

Perfect active infinitive: (to) have sung. Perfect active participle: having sung.

In other words, participles are formed by adding ing to an infinitive. In English, the ing-forms serve as gerunds as well: Singing is fun.

I have noticed that some of the terminology I am familiar with is not generally used by native speakers. There's nothing much I can do about it - and I certainly do not want to impose my terminology on native speakers. There are different terms, and I often have no idea what native speakers are talking about when I read their posts! Emotion: smile

CB
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