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It seems to me that English people pronounce the word "year" according to the sentence.
When they say " one year" the word "year" in pronounced with a sound like A. YAR.
When they say " two years" the word "year" is pronounced with a sound like O. YOR.
Is this correct?
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Neither yar nor yor.
It rhymes with ear or ears.
Yeer or yeerz.
Try to pronounce "one year" and you ll find that you are not pronouncing ear sound. Americans would pronounce "one year" like in fur.
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I *am* an American. I don't say "yur."
austere125riversWhen they say " one year" the word "year" in pronounced with a sound like A. YAR.When they say " two years" the word "year" is pronounced with a sound like O. YOR.Is this correct?
One yahr, two yoars? No.

R-colored vowels do tend to be pronounced closer to the center of the mouth, and the amount of centralizing varies from one speaker to another, but modifying a vowel from EE to AH or OA is not part of this centralizing process.

The EE of year can be relatively uncentralized (EE in peek), moderately centralized (I in pick), or completely centralized (ER in her). The speakers I am most familiar with do not often centralize the 'ear' in 'year' completely, so I don't hear 'yer' a lot. If there are people who regularly do that, it must be in another region. I probably hear the moderately centralized version the most often.

CJ
Thank you calif. very interesting replay as usual Emotion: yes but I am quiet sure of my remarks. Maybe you are a native speaker you may not pay close attention to some pronunciations,for example I have heard so many times English news reporters saying " dish year" instead of "this year" . Even my phonetic signs show me that the letter "th" in "other" and "others" is pronounced differently. They are the same words, one singular the other is plural and yet the "th" is pronounced differently.
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'dish year' sounds regional, but 'thish year' is a normal effect without which you can't sound authentically English.

See "CH" sound before YOU
austere125riversmy phonetic signs show me that the letter "th" in "other" and "others" is pronounced differently. ... one singular the other is plural and yet the "th" is pronounced differently.
Which signs are 'your phonetic signs'? Are they different from other people's phonetic signs? Emotion: tongue tied

Your results are astonishing, in any case. You must be doing some incredibly narrow phonetic transcriptions.

Maybe we should get some spectrograms or study these with an oscilloscope. Emotion: smile

CJ
Here is snap shot from my dictionary
I believe your dictionary is mistaken.

I don't know what institution published that dictionary, but I would not trust it completely. They should be using the same symbol in both of those words for the 'th' sound in 'other ( s )', namely 'dh'.

I checked words that have the same ending (mother, father, hither, ...) and only the entry for 'others' was given with the 'th'. They just missed that one, I suppose.

CJ
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