I have always wondered why the English proverb He is as poor as a church mouse is He is as poor as a church rat in Finnish. What is it in your language? Can you give us some examples of equivalents of English proverbs or sayings are in your language, please.

Here are a couple of other examples:

To carry coals to Newcastle. Finnish: To go further than the sea to fish.
When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
Finnish: In a country in the country's way. (That's awkward in English!)
All that glitters is not gold. Finnish: The same, just a slightly different word order.

CB
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They are really so different in Turkish too.

You will be shown the door --- in Turkish you wil find yourself outside of the house or you will find yourself on the other side of the door.

I have to eat loaves of bread or I have toı eat a full bakery of bread ( this may not mean anything in English) ---- in English I still have a long way to go.

Early bird eats the worm -- in Turkish, the one who gets up early will go farther
Yes, there are different and in many ways queer meanings of the same proverbs.

When in Rome - do as the Romans do = You shouldn't come to a convent with your own law. (Russian version)

To carry coal to Newcastle = To go to Tula with your own samovar.

The last straw that breaks the camel's back = The last drop of the full cup.
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In Italian:

He is as poor as a church mouse
>> He is poor in reed. (it's not a misspelling for "red" ... it's the plant! it doesn't make sense, does it?)
When in Rome, do as the Romans do. >> Town where you go, tradition that you find.(Emotion: tongue tied not only is it ungrammatical, it's also weird!)
All that glitters is not gold. >> Exactly the same, apart from word order (I wonder whether it's the same order as in Finnish ...)
The last straw >> The last drop (which makes the vase overflow)
A leopard cannot change its spots>> Lions lose their fur, but not their habits.

Cannot think of anything similar to "
To carry coal to Newcastle".
Hi CB. Just out of curiosity, what would be equivalent in Finnish to: charity begins at home? I can't figure out anything suitable.
ZeroxHi CB. Just out of curiosity, what would be equivalent in Finnish to: charity begins at home? I can't figure out anything suitable.
Sorry, Zerox, nor can I. If I can think of something later, I'll come back with it.

For some previous posters: The saying is to carry coals to Newcastle, not: to carry coal to Newcastle.

CB
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I've always wondered why in England "One swallow does not make a summer" while in Italy it doesn't make a springEmotion: big smile
TanitA leopard cannot change its spots>> Lions lose their fur, but not their habits.
In Tuscany we say wolves
I think it may be because "summer", in older usage, consisted of the warmer half of the year.

"Spring" is a relatively recent term for the vernal season (14th/15th century); previously, "Lent" was used, which doesn't alliterate very well with "swallow".

Though I suppose they could have changed the bird.

("One little ringed plover doesn't make a Lent"?)

MrP
Nice one MrP Emotion: big smile

I guess your explanation could be more correct than mine: in fact I thought that swallows go to England in summer because English spring is colder than Italian one Emotion: stick out tongue
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