For the purpose of multilingual programming which I won't dwelve on here, I really need words like "read" to differ in the following scheme.

write writing written
hear hearing heard
say saying said
..... ..... .....
read reading read*
set setting set*
split splitting split*
I would like to use instead of read*, set* and split*, forms that are immediately recognizable by the english speaking as misspelled, arcane or naïve attempts at forming perfectum participes, and that wouldn't puzzle or annoy the user too much if they occasionallly appeared in error messages, tool tips etc. of a computer application.

So far the best I've come up with is to simply add a d:

readd - setd - splitd
but I'd like to know if there are better options.
How do young children deal with these forms? Do they make mistakes that might seem more sensible than my added d's?
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For the purpose of multilingual programming which I won't dwelve on here,

Thanks for not dwelving. Google found 897 instances where others weren't so kind.
Shouldn't "dwelve" be on a list somewhere? Eggcorn, anyone?

Mike
For the purpose of multilingual programming which I won't dwelve on here, I really need words like "read" to differ ... to simply add a d: readd - setd - splitd but I'd like to know if there are better options.

readed, setted and splitted
How do young children deal with these forms?

They make mistakes until they learn to use the correct form.
Do they make mistakes that might seem more sensible than my added d's?

I don't think so.
Adrian
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
@fe3.news.blueyonder.co.uk:
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How do young children deal with these forms?

They make mistakes until they learn to use the correct form.

Actually, it is probably more correct to say that they follow the rules that they have already learned until they learn the exceptions to them.

David Wright Sr.
http://home.alltel.net/dwrighsr/index.html
To e-mail me, remove 't' from dwrightsr
Young children are especially prone to apply the rules for regular verbs to irregular ones: I goed, etc.
For the purpose of multilingual programming which I won't dwelve on here, I really need words like "read" to differ ... to simply add a d: readd - setd - splitd but I'd like to know if there are better options.

Use -en, not d. If you're generating artificial
ungrammatical past participle forms, -en will
work in most cases, where -d will just be confused with past tense.
So, for the cut-class verbs, which are the same in all tenses, you'd get
betten
bidden
bursten
casten
costen
cuten
fitten
hitten
hurten
letten
putten
quitten
ridden
setten
shedden
shitten
shutten
slitten
spitten
splitten
spreaden
thrusten
upsetten
all of which are terrible, but all of
which would be recognized as an attempt
to form a past participle. You'd have
to double final consonants in some
cases, but note that -en *is* the Germanic
suffix for strong verbs already, so in
a sense it's already programmed.
A strange request, if you don't mind my saying so.

-John Lawler U of Michigan Linguistics Dept
http://www.umich.edu/~jlawler/disclaimers.html
#include disclaimers.h
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
For the purpose of multilingual programming which I won't dwelve on here,

Thanks for not dwelving. Google found 897 instances where others weren't so kind. Shouldn't "dwelve" be on a list somewhere? Eggcorn, anyone?

I can see it now: people are going to ask if every possible mistake is an "eggcorn," and Chris is going to rue the day he made that site.

The way *I* interpret "eggcorn," the pronunciations (the mistake and the actual) have to be nearly identical in sound, the mistake has to be an actual word or words, and the mistake has to be appropriate, in some sense, in regard to meaning.
"Dwelve" isn't a word. "Dwelve" doesn't sound like (i.e., almost exactly like) "dwell," nor "delve." It can't be an eggcorn.

However, you could say it is a portmanteau of "dwell" and "delve."

Best Donna Richoux
Thanks for not dwelving. Google found 897 instances where othersweren't so kind. Shouldn't "dwelve" be on a list somewhere? Eggcorn, anyone?

I can see it now: people are going to ask if every possible mistake is an "eggcorn," and Chris is ... "Dwelve" isn't a word. "Dwelve" doesn't sound like (i.e., almost exactly like) "dwell," nor "delve." It can't be an eggcorn.[/nq]Did you not read his reply to the post you made condemning my other suggestion? Have you not been to his eggcorn database website? If you don't agree, fine. But there is no call for you to be patronizing. What is this, your personal mission to ensure Eggcorn Purity? FYI, I don't plan on researching and sharing a bunch of eggcorns. There have been a few posted here recently, and I don't see anything wrong with making a small note of it when they are, especially in light of the fact that eggcorns and other malapropisms have been heavily on topic.

Besides, what would this site be without everybody pointing out each other's usage mistakes? I think it sounds like "delve." In fact, not only does it sound like "delve", it is typically used instead of "delve." How is that not an eggcorn? What would be the point of restricting eggcorns to actual words, especially if the non-actual word is used so consistently? Hell, "eggcorn" isn't a word. Wait long enough, "dwelve" will be in The Dictionary. "Dwelve" sounds as much like "delve" as "eggcorn" sounds like "acorn", as much as "slings" sounds like "stings", as much as "extract" sounds like "exact", as much as "minus" sounds like "might as", etc.

It also sounds enough like "dwell" that more than one person has made the substitution. Of all the hits returned by Google, I would say that over 95% of them are a substitution of "dwelve" for "delve" and to a lesser degree "dwell."
http://eggcorns.lascribe.net / so you can see for yourself the eggcorns being collected.
http://degrees8.tripod.com/id6.html
Study the Arts,dwelve deeper into the unknown,learn to overcome your fears.

http://www.gamefaqs.com/portable/ds/review/R82847.html The storyline doesn't even dwelve into that.
Here's another "dwell":
http://www.9types.com/wwwboard/messages/9.html
One good thing though: I don't dwelve on anything too much.

http://evelynrodriguez.typepad.com/crossroads dispatches/2005/01/full catastroph 3.html What I'm getting to is that I'm going to fully dwelve into this book and a face-to-face MBSR program for myself. I am in the process of creating a private blog (so that all participants have a safe environment and are guest authors as well) that will cover the book's program over a nine-week period (first week intro), beginning hopefully next week (or when more than four people have indicated interest).
http://www.mtsobek.com/features/Alps/chef.htm
Before you dwelve into preparing this typical "Alps" dinner, we would like to tell you story from our first trip in the Alps in 1970.
Mike
In fact, not only does it sound like "delve", it is typically used insteadof "delve."

I meant to change this to "...when used, it is typically instead of "delve", but I forgot. .
Mike
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