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Hi,

My understanding is that if you are dealing with variable nouns, you would use the uncountable version if you want use it in a general sense and the countable version if you want to use it as an instance of it and for an uncountable noun, the same logic applies but includes the notion of turning into a type of the word or thinking in a separate (different) degree in addition to thinking of it as an instance of it.

I want to use the sentence below to ask you some questions.

Start slowly to allow for complete integration of words, actions and feelings.

The word 'integration' is uncountable (I think) and has an adjective 'complete' before it and the modifying phrase 'of words' after it.

If I replace 'complete' with 'total', then something unexpected (at least to me) happens and suddenly you need an article like 'a' before the word 'total', I think.

Start slowly to allow for a total integration of words actions, and feelings.

Q1: How do we know it is talking about an instance of something for the above situation?

Now, Let me make some other changes.

Q2: Are the articles for the sentences below properly placed?

Start slowly to allow for whole integration (the whole integration??) of words, actions, and feelings.

Start slowly to allow for absolute integration of words, actions and feelings.

Start slowly to allow for full integration of words, actions, and feelings.

Q3: Is the adjective 'total' an exclusive kind of word? If it is, are there any others like it?

Again, sorry if my question is too long. Any help would be appreciated.

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No a.
The situation doesn't change because of total:

At Google, in hits:

112 for "allow for complete integration"
18 for "allow for a complete integration"

18 for "allow for total integration"
0 for"allow for a total integration"
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I don't think I can answer all your questions, but here's an easy one that I can answer.

Start slowly to allow for a total integration of words actions, and feelings.
Q1: How do we know it is talking about an instance of something for the above situation?

Because the word a is used.

CJ