1 2 3 4
chrissy filted:
No less than 100 years. Generally, many more. Eras tend ... the era of the French kings, the era of mammals.

Aren't they "the age of the ()"?

You have to be careful with that one...Terry Carr once said "the golden age of science fiction is twelve"..r
Cheers, Chrissy.
I'm less familiar with Confucius than I am with Buddha. He advises we have no truck with inferior humans, let alone amoral ones such as Coop. (The way newsgroups are structured, we have little choice.)

A book of sutras I recent completely advises it is quite all right to kill the likes of a person infested with devils as the Coop surely is. He only does harm. We'd be doing the world a favour, was the point, if we exterminated the ***. I, along with many others here, have been far too easy on him.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Aren't they "the age of the ()"? I guess I ... remember kindnesses. Life's too short to dwell on pain. cheers

Cheers, Chrissy. I'm less familiar with Confucius than I am with Buddha. He advises we have no truck with inferior ... the point, if we exterminated the ***. I, along with many others here, have been far too easy on him.

Quite apart from any question of coopicide, a mitzvah which you would surely complete compassionately, I wonder if the Buddha was not speaking allegorically. Do you have the text handy? I'd be interested to see a citation, or even (being lazy) a quotation, of this advice.
Cheers, Chrissy. I'm less familiar with Confucius than I am ... many others here, have been far too easy on him.

Quite apart from any question of coopicide, a mitzvah which you would surely complete compassionately, I wonder if the Buddha ... have the text handy? I'd be interested to see a citation, or even (being lazy) a quotation, of this advice.

I'm sure it wasn't meant to be advice, but you can judge for yourself whether Bodhidharma, perhaps the founder of Zen Buddhism in China, meant it allegorically. As with the oft-heard 'Kill the Buddha', I doubt if any Buddhist would take it literally, at least not present-day ones; killing any sentient being is anathema to Buddhists, but one of the footnotes below expands on this.
A strong case could be made for 'killing' off contact with someone who is deluded, someone who hasn't seen the true nature of things, someone who has no understanding. Buddha himself advised us many times to avoid contact with people less knowledgeable and aware than ourselves: leave them to their own devices since nothing good can be learned from them.
This is taken from the 'Bloodstream Sermon', found in the The Zen Teaching of Bodhidharma , published by North Point Press:

'Among Shakyamuni's (1) ten greatest disciples, Ananda was foremost in learning. But he didn't know the Buddha. All he did was study and memorize. Arhats (2) don't know the Buddha. All they know are so many practices for realization, and they become trapped by cause and effect. Such is a mortal's karma: no escape from birth and death. By doing the opposite of what he intended, such people blaspheme the Buddha. Killing them would not be wrong. The sutras say, 'Since icchantikas (3) are incapable of belief, killing them would be blameless, whereas people who believe reach the state of buddhahood.'
1. Shakya was the Buddha's clan name.
2. An Arhat has no compassion. He doesn't realize that all mortalsshare the same nature and that there aren't any buddhas unless everyone is a buddha.

3. A class of being who break the precepts and refuse to repent.(Personal note: it that doesn't encapsulate Coop in the fewest words possible, I don't know what would.) An early Chinese translation of the Nirvana Sutra denied the icchantikas possessed the buddha-nature. Since the Buddhist prohibition against killing is intended to prevent killing anyone capable of buddhahood, killing icchantikas was, at least in theory, held to be blameless. A later translation of the Nirvana Sutra , however, rectified this notion, asserting that even icchantikas have the buddha-nature.
It seems to me the monk was expressing the view of the time, meaning 'killing' quite literally. Being modern men, we wouldn't ascribe to this, but his warnings against icchantikas remain valid and unchanged. In other words, if Bodhidharma were with us today and subscribed to AUE or AEU, he wouldn't tolerate Coop in either.

Charles Riggs
There are no accented letters in my email address
Quite apart from any question of coopicide, a mitzvah which ... citation, or even (being lazy) a quotation, of this advice.

I'm sure it wasn't meant to be advice, but you can judge for yourself whether Bodhidharma, perhaps the founder of ... other words, if Bodhidharma were with us today and subscribed to AUE or AEU, he wouldn't tolerate Coop in either.

Thanks for that. The advice sounds very much on the Theravada side, almost Taoist. I find Tibetan Buddhism very appealing emotionally, but keep wondering if that kind of inward focus wouldn't be more likely to lead to what one is looking for.
I wonder if there's a sage somewhere who would advise us to kill our inner coop. (Sorry, Sir. No actual Coops are meant to be harmed in the making of that statement.)
Our local newspaper, a rag whose economistic excesses I deplore, runs a feature in which a religious question is answered by representatives of various faiths; occasionally the question is suitable for answering by a Buddhist named Ajahn Viradhammo, a man whom I suspect of having a sense of humour.
Last year, he chose to tell a story in answer to, "What happens to the soul after a person dies? If there is a waiting period before it goes to heaven,what is the purpose?", as follows.
Once, not so long ago, there was a fierce and fearsome Samurai, who roamed throughout Japan seeking truth and imposing justice. He had little time for clerics and monks and would often challenge religious types who he felt were charlatans. One winter he found himself in the royal city of Kyoto where he began to hear about a much-loved Zen monk by the name of Master Sensei. Revered for his profound wisdom and deep compassion, the Master was also well known for his fearlessness.

The Samurai decided to challenge Master Sensei and test his profound wisdom. Dressed in the trappings of a warrior, with a great sword at his side, he approached the monastery, its pinetrees shrouded in the silent mist of a winter day. The Master greeted him with dignity and respect but the Samurai soon challenged him. "So, shaven one, I'm told you have deep knowlege of hidden matters. Tell me then, great Master, where is heaven and where is hell."
The Master replied, "You unshaven weakling. You haven't even washed. You walk around like an overstuffed windbag. You're no Samurai. You're a joke." Alight with rage, the Samurai swiftly drew his sword and was about to slay Master Sensei.
Fearlessly staring into the eyes of the Samurai, the Master said, "That is hell."
The Samurai stopped with his sword in mid-air. He quietly returned it to the scabbard and bowed deeply to the monk.
The Master said, "And that is heaven."

I wasn't going to edit that, but partway through I had to, and then a bit of interference became too tempting.
Maybe coop (note non-capitalization) exists in the world to be a learning opportunity for samurais. Maybe coop is a karmic payoff. Maybe we all have to learn to coop with life, to cooperate, to live in our own coop. I rest my case.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I do hope you get over the Coop thing ... it's almost the first thing I remember about you when ... was surely right when he advised us to forget hurts and remember kindnesses. Life's too short to dwell on pain.

I've not been here that long, and while I've been here I haven't been assiduous about reading every single message in every single thread, though I do what I can. But try as I might, I can't actually find any evidence of Coop's "malevolence", at least where it differs qualitatively or quantitavely from anyone else's, Charles' included. Now Rey Aman, there was a man who could spit invective. But Coop? Seems like a decent enough cove to me. So, in the spirit of enquiry and research, I ask for evidence, please.
Will.
I do hope you get over the Coop thing ... ... and remember kindnesses. Life's too short to dwell on pain.

I've not been here that long, and while I've been here I haven't been assiduous about reading every single message ... a decent enough cove to me. So, in the spirit of enquiry and research, I ask for evidence, please. Will.

You'll get none from me. I cannot calim to have read more than a dozen of the Coop's offerings, and saw no malevolence at all. But Charles is convinced that there is, and that's why I said "in your view".

Initially, briefly, Charles thought I was possibly Cooper himself.

cheers
Chrissy
I do hope you get over the Coop thing ... ... and remember kindnesses. Life's too short to dwell on pain.

I've not been here that long, and while I've been here I haven't been assiduous about reading every single message ... like a decent enough cove to me. So, in the spirit of enquiry and research, I ask for evidence, please.

It's a game of tag, played between two willing participants. They seem to enjoy it, and they don't do the rest of us any harm.

David
==
replace usenet with the
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I've not been here that long, and while I've ... spirit of enquiry and research, I ask for evidence, please.

It's a game of tag, played between two willing participants. They seem to enjoy it, and they don't do the rest of us any harm.

Yes, got it in one. I've never really figured out if Charles is serious or not, but it's rather immaterial to me if he is or isn't. I respond sometimes because it amuses me. I never take offense at his comments. It's just Charles, you know.
There are certain people in newsgroups that seem to need a permanent adversary. Who am I to deprive them of this?
Will is on dangerous ground asking for evidence. That's rather like plucking a stick out of a pile of sticks and risking that the entire construction comes crashing down. If Charles can't come up with viable evidence of malevolence, then he appears to be just surly and unpleasant. I like him far too much to wish that upon him.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
Show more