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Tony Cooper and Matti Lamprhey write:
I would have expected "I have pleaded ..." is this another pondialism?

No, just a simple typo ...

Nevertheless it *is* pondian, or rather, specifically US. The past participle of "plead" in US usage is often formed like those of "lead" or "read" (that is, it's pronounced "pled" and spelled either "pled" or "plead"), and I think especially so in the context of criminal law. A quick check in Google News confirms my feeling that this usage is rare in Canada. Of the two spellings, the first is more common; www.m-w.com rates the second as an "also".
Mark Brader "By this time I was feeling guilty. No, correction, Toronto I was feeling that I should feel guilty ..." (Email Removed) Jude Devereaux

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The past participle of "plead" in US usage ...

Past tense and past participle, in fact.

Mark Brader, Toronto Don't put all your X in one window. (Email Removed) Peter Neumann
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Tony Cooper and Matti Lamprhey write:

No, just a simple typo ...

Nevertheless it *is* pondian, or rather, specifically US. The past participle of "plead" in US usage is often formed like ... it's pronounced "pled" and spelled either "pled" or "plead"), and I think especially so in the context of criminal law.

I think "pled" was once considered informal/colloquial, but today it seems to compete pretty well with "pleaded". I've also read that it is used in Scotland.
I'd use "pleaded".
Nevertheless it *is* pondian, or rather, specifically US. The past participle of "plead" in US usage is often formed like ... is rare in Canada. Of the two spellings, the first is more common; www.m-w.com rates the second as an "also".

The New Shorter Oxford English Dicitonary has " PaEmotion: storm t(ense) & p(artici)ple pleaded" with "pled" marked "now chiefly Sc(ottish) dial(ect), & N(orth) Amer(ican)".
Nevertheless it *is* pondian, or rather, specifically US. The past ... is more common; www.m-w.com rates the second as an "also".

The New Shorter Oxford English Dicitonary has " PaEmotion: storm t(ense) & p(artici)ple pleaded" with "pled" marked "now chiefly Sc(ottish) dial(ect), & N(orth) Amer(ican)".

I wouldn't blink at "pled", but for me "plead" can only be present-tense. Cf. "lead" (verb) and "led".

Odysseus
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Tony Cooper and Matti Lamprhey write:

No, just a simple typo ...

Nevertheless it *is* pondian, or rather, specifically US. The past participle of "plead" in US usage is often formed like ... is rare in Canada. Of the two spellings, the first is more common; www.m-w.com rates the second as an "also".

I'm not sure where you're going on this. "I plead guilty to..." is very much the current tense. I am acknowledging the charge and I'm responding to it with a plea of guilty. The "have to" is just a addition of willingness to so plead: "I have to plead guilty to this."
The "pled" would indicate that I went for a guilty plea sometime in the past. I may have done so, since Charles often makes the same charge, but this post is responsive to his current charge.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
Nevertheless it *is* pondian, or rather, specifically US. The past ... it's pronounced "pled" and spelled either "pled" or "plead") ...

I'm not sure where you're going on this. "I plead guilty to..." is very much the current tense.

If you pronounce it "pleed" it's present tense. ("Current" tense!?) If "pled", it means the same as "pled" or "pleaded". Again I cite . For myself, I say "pleaded".

One thing that m-w.com doesn't have, at least not in the free part of the site, is the sense of "plead" that I commonly hear on Law & Order where it specifically means "to plead guilty". An offer of "I will agree to a sentence of 6 years with parole possible after 3 years if your client pleads guilty to manslaughter in the first degree" becomes "He pleads to man 1, 3 to 6."

Mark Brader > "...the government is simply a bunch of people we've Toronto > hired to protect ourselves from thieves and murderers (Email Removed) > and rapists and other governments..." Bill Stewart

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I wouldn't blink at "pled", but for me "plead" can only be present-tense. Cf. "lead" (verb) and "led".

But, since dictionaries tell us that there are those who like to use "plead" as present, past, and past participle, we need to be prepared to come across those spellings in our reading.
This, by the way, is an answer to the question someone posed in recent weeks as to whether there are other verbs whose present and past parallel the case of present "read" and past "read". Just as I've tentatively chosen to write "reed" and "redd" instead of "read" and "read", and knowing that some people will take "plead" to possibly be past tense, if I had occasion to use "plead" much more than I do, I would consider using the spellings "pleed" and "pledd".

I could use "pled" for the past, but I find the symmetry of "pleed" and "pledd" more pleasing.
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I have plead guilty to this.

I would have expected "I have pleaded ..." is this another pondialism? Would you also write "Yesterday, I plead guilty to this"? Or would that have been "pleaded" too?

Should be "pleden" by analogy with "proven".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
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