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Hi!
I'm as stranger totaly confused from these sentences:

1. How is it look like?

2. How it is look like?

3. How is it looking out?
4. How it is looking out?
5. How it looks like?

6. How does it look like?

Please, could you tell me which of these sentences are correct? I remember that the first one is correct, but I really don't know why. Maybe it is some phrase.

Thank you very much!
Paul
Comments  
AnonymousHi!

I'm as stranger totaly confused from these sentences:

1. How is it look like?

2. How it is look like?

3. How is it looking out?
4. How it is looking out?
5. How it looks like?

6. How does it look like?

Please, could you tell me which of these sentences are correct? I remember that the first one is correct, but I really don't know why. Maybe it is some phrase.

Thank you very much!
Paul

Hi Paul,
I'm sorry, but NONE of those are correct.

How is it looking? (You are in the process of creating a painting. You ask someone for their opinion as it is forming.)

How does it look? (You ask someone for an opinion of what is in front of them. It may or may not be finished.)

What does it look like? (You ask someone to describe something they see or have seen.)

How is it? (Is something good or bad?)
3 and 6 are correct

the others are wrong:

a question can never start llike this:

how it is.....

but, it can start like this:

how is it.....
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Sorry, but even 3 and 6 are wrong, with the addition of "out" and "like," respectively.
For the first, thanks for the answers! I really appreciate it!

Oh, everything is wrong. That's bad. Could I have more questions yet?

1. So it means that I can't use 'like' with 'how' ? I understand to two middle sentences.
How does it look. [it doesn't mean any material thing only how I can see the future ]

What does it look like. [it means what I can see in the real world]

But don't uderstand why there is 'How' word in the sentence below:
How is it looking?
why there isn't:
What is it looking?

Painting can be actually seen in real world. It isn't thought/idea, if you understand me. It's in front of you - not in your head.

2. 'How is it?' - Is the same like How are you?

3. Another thing if I can: what is correct of following sentences? e.g. you are looking out of the window:

I see a car on the street.

I can see a car on the street.

I heard that 'I see' means 'understand'. Because of that I should say 'I can see' when I'm looking at something. You use sentence
'You ask someone to describe something they see or have seen.',
therefore I am confused - why don't you use 'they can see'?

Paul
While you are waiting for G.G. to respond, I would like to toss in my two cents. As written in your first post, none of them are correct, as pointed out by G.G.

Some of your questions really had me stumped. [:^)] because I never think about them in the context you were asking before. Some of them are really fundamental stuffs and I am surprised by these questions.

How are you ? is a greeting when you meet someone. I am sure you know that.

How is it ? can be many scenariors. Your friend is helping you to fix your dead computer while you went out to get some pizza and beers. When you came back , you were anxious to find out the outcome. So you asked: "how is it?".

Your mother in-law cooked a chicken pot pie for you to take home when you and your wife visited her. Your in-law's cooking is not your favorite. So you asked your wife to taste it first while you were watching her expression, then asked: "Well, how it is"?

How does it look? - Your wife bought a new dress and she is putting it on for you. She turned around in front of the mirror and asked you: "honey, how does it look?".

When I am going for my 2nd job interview, I would say: my job prospect is looking really good.

I see = understand. That's a given (only used in present tense).

I see + noun

I see my neighbor at the bus stop everyday =You two arrive at the bus stop nearly the same time everyday, and you see him waiting for the bus. (present tense)

I have seen this movie 3 times since it came out. (present perfect tense with no defined time).

I am not sure I helped clear up some of your confusions, or I made it worse...Emotion: sad
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Well, ok.

So, why don't you use "can" in your present tense sentence?

I can see my neighbor at the bus stop everyday.

Paul
You can use 'can' there, but native speakers normally use simple present instead. Also, please note that 'everyday' is an adjective meaning 'mundane', while 'every day' is a noun or adverb meaning 'each day'.