+0
Hi,

Please tell me how I can use the word "etc." properly if I want to use it in the middle of the sentence.

When you talk about things like jobs, schools, hobbies, etc., it is very ...

I am asking because I usually see them like this: etc...
1 2
Comments  
Anonymous
Hi,

Please tell me how I can use the word "etc." properly if I want to use it in the middle of the sentence.

When you talk about things like jobs, schools, hobbies, etc., it is very ...

I am asking because I usually see them like this: etc...
I use 'etc.' very rarely. "jobs, schools and hobbies" are enough examples to give. 'etc' often tells me the writer can't think of any more examples. However, I would punctuate it as you have (without the underlining). Furthermore, for the sake of appearance, I would reverse the clauses in order to put 'etc.' at the end of the sentence.
I am trying to use "i.e." in a sentence, I am going for a walk, i.e., in the park.
Try out our live chat room.
Use "i.e." to mean "that is."

Let's say your friend's father smokes cigarettes, but his wife has been nagging him to quit. He pretends he no longer smokes, she pretends to believe him, but eveyone knows he still sneaks out for them. Someone asks where he is, and she say, "Oh, he's gone out for a stroll, i.e., to sneak a smoke, but I expect he'll be back shortly, chewing mint gum."

Or:

Right about 5 p.m., i.e., quitting time, there's a stampede for the front door.
Grammar GeekUse "i.e." to mean "that is."

Let's say your friend's father smokes cigarettes, but his wife has been nagging him to quit. He pretends he no longer smokes, she pretends to believe him, but eveyone knows he still sneaks out for them. Someone asks where he is, and she say, "Oh, he's gone out for a stroll, i.e., to sneak a smoke, but I expect he'll be back shortly, chewing mint gum."

Or:

Right about 5 p.m., i.e., quitting time, there's a stampede for the front door.
I always get quite a kick out of your examples, GGEmotion: big smile
Thanks Emotion: smile You should see what fixes the characters in my short stories get into Emotion: smile
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
GG,
i would not have commented on much here, except that your are presumptively GG.
your sentense ends in a dangling preposition. this has long been accepted but has equally long been akward, incomplete and ugly. i suggest that everyone fight the urge to dangle and with a little forthought construct more elegant text. while writting one usually has plenty of time to avoid this, and i know that it is much more difficult when speeking not to dangle prepositions but not imposible.
(yes, i know that capitilization is my laziness.)
stephen
Upon receiving such pedantic criticism, Winston Churchill, a very famous writer, made an equally famous response:
Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

The strict edict against ending sentences with a preposition is a long-standing myth of grammar and now regarded as pure poppycock.

It is along the lines of the same silly rule: do not begin a sentence with either "and" or "but".
Stephen,
I normally would not have commented either. However, you don't capitalize although you know that you should. You attribute this to your laziness, while requesting others to use a little forethought for the sake of elegant text.

By the way, you misspelled sentence, awkward, forethought, writing, speaking, impossible and capitalization. You also write run on sentences containing incoherent ideas.

-Sham
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more