+0

I have found that we can add a negative statement after an affirmative one by using "not...too". (Oxford Dictionary and Practical English Usage)

Two of the examples are:

You can have a burger, but you can't have fries too.

He drinks too much, but at least he doesn't smoke too.

I notice both subjects are the same person. So, I was wondering if we can say the following with 'too'.

1) A and B were in a car accident. A died in the accident, but (B was lucky) B didn't die too.

2) There are 3 people in a house: a father, a son, and a daughter. The father is preparing to go hunting. He turns to the boy and says "You can come with me." Then he turns to the girl and says "But you can't come too."

3) "Jim likes tea, but James doesn't like it too."


Note: I know we can cut 'too' out, but I really want to know if the above sentences are correct.


Thank you.

-1
red mango 193He drinks too much, but at least he doesn't smoke too.

That is not good. The ending "too" is incorrect.

He drinks too much, but at least he doesn't smoke. too.

red mango 1931) A and B were in a car accident. A died in the accident, but (B was lucky) B didn't die too.

A and B were in a car accident. A died in the accident, but B didn't die too.

red mango 1933) "Jim likes tea, but James doesn't like it too."

Jim likes tea, but James doesn't like it too.