+0

For example, do you shorten the phrase "a change from simple rules to complex rules" to the phrase "a change from simple to complex rules" or "a change from simple rules to complex"?
Also, do you usually omit a common noun in a prepositional phrase like the above sentence? (I am curious because my native language does not allow such omission.)

+0
lifelong learner"a change from simple rules to complex rules"

"a change in rules from from simple to complex"

Comments  
lifelong learnerFor example, do you shorten the phrase "a change from simple rules to complex rules" to the phrase "a change from simple to complex rules" or "a change from simple rules to complex"?

They are both possible, but the original form is best—the reader isn't forced to keep score as he goes. There is also "a change from simple rules to complex ones", of course, which avoids the repetition in a less intrusive way.

lifelong learnerAlso, do you usually omit a common noun in a prepositional phrase like the above sentence? (I am curious because my native language does not allow such omission.)

People do it all the time, but I probably do it less than most.

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.