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Hi,

Will you tell me the normal way of saying the underlined part?

a pair of Janet's gloves? or simply, Janet's gloves?

This is from a book (He was a lisp issue):
Plurals presented a considerable problem, but I worked around them as best I could; "rivers," for example, became either "a river or two" or "many a river." Possessives were a similar headache, and it was easier to say nothing to announce that the left-hand and the right-hand glove of Janet had fallen to the floor.

Thank you,
M
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Janet's gloves is fine. I would say a pair of Janet's gloves only if she had several pairs of gloves with her.

CB
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It is of course easier and clearer for the original, where the writer is obviously trying to avoid saying 'Janet's gloves'.
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Comments  

If you say “a pair of Janet’s gloves”, it implies she has multiple pairs with her, so it is better to use “Janet’s gloves”.
Thank you,

M
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 Mister Micawber's reply was promoted to an answer.