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Excuse me. Could you tell me _______________?

(A) how can I get to the police station

(B) how get to the police station

(C) how I get to the police station

(D) how to get to the polce station

D is correct. Is C also acceptable?
Comments  
C isn't really correct. The person can't tell you how will get there. (By bike, on foot, which path you'll take.) You may say "...how I CAN get to the police station," but even so, D is a superior answer.
Excuse me. How do I get to the police station?

Is the above expression acceptable?
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Absolutely.
I think his question is if "How do I get to the police station?" is correct, then why does "Could you tell me how I get to the police station?" not work?

How did you get the money ?(correct)--> Could you tell me how you got the money?(also correct)
I thought one was an exam question and so we were looking for the best answer.

I thought the other was a "real life, if I'm in the city and need to ask, can I do this" question.

You can alway ask how someone ELSE got something - they would know that. Someone else can't tell you how YOU will get somewhere. I was going to add to the "real life" example and if someone was inclined to be a bit of a smark alec, that person could say something like "I don't know how you get there. But if I were going, I'd head down Main Street, ..." etc.
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<<< I think his question is if "How do I get to the police station?" is correct, then why does "Could you tell me how I (can/could) get to the police station?" not work?>>>

David,

The two questions above are sound questions except you need to add an aux. word to make the latter question more understandable..

I believe that the problem with asking if certain form of the question is correct really depends on a couple of criteria. 1- it must be grammatically correct. 2- It must be structurally sound and understandable. 3- It must make sense in the context in which you are expressing. Sometimes, we make the questions unnecessarily more complicated than the need to be.

Think about the scenarios below:

John found a wallet on the street and he wanted to turn it in to a police station. He stopped a passerby and said “excuse me sir. Could you please tell me how I could get to the police station”. (this is perfectly fine). “How do I get to the police station” dose not fit this context, although it made criterion # 1 and 2.

To change the scenario a little, Mary’s was asked to return some books to the new library for her sister and she has never been there since it’s opening to the public.

Her sister: Mary, on your way to school, can you drop off these books at the new library for me?

Mary: How do I get to the new library? I’ve never been there before. In this context, the question is absolutely perfect.
TeoExcuse me. Could you tell me _______________?
(A) how can I get to the police station
(B) how get to the police station
(C) how I get to the police station
(D) how to get to the polce station
D is correct. Is C also acceptable?
anonymousD is correct. Is C also acceptable?

No. It makes no sense.

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