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Hi,

1: I think Pacino in Al Pacino is pronounced like pa-chee-no. But Why don't we simply pronounce it as pa-see-no?

2: How do we pronounce Scorsese in Martin Scorsese? Is this

i: score-see-se

or

ii: score-see-ze

3: Why do we pronounce Sean in Sean Connery like shawn? I think rather it must be pronounced like cean like sen in senate or like seen.
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In numerous TV interviews and in videos in which he plays himself, Martin Scorsese pronounces his name as score-se-see...no "z" sounds or "ay" sounds. It amazes me how many movie critics and actors (including those acting in Scorsese movies!) mispronounce his name. See this clip from an Entourage episode:
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Scorsese is pronounced
score - say - zee

The English pronuncations of these words are approximating the pronunciations in the languages they are from. Pacino and Scorsese are from Italian, Sean is from Gaelic. That's why their pronunciations are unusual.
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I say them as:
Pacino [ patSino ]
Scorsese [ skOrsEzE ] or occasionally [ skOrsEze(I) ]
Sean [ SAn ]
AlienvoordScorsese is pronounced
score - say - zee

The English pronuncations of these words are approximating the pronunciations in the languages they are from. Pacino and Scorsese are from Italian, Sean is from Gaelic. That's why their pronunciations are unusual.
Alienvoord, according to you we pronounce Pacino as pa-chee-no because we are approximating italian pronunciation. But why isn't Pacino just written as Pachino or Pacheeno because Pacino is misleading word as far as pronunciation is concerned? Perhaps Al Pacino chose these weird spellings for pa-chee-no himself to distinguish himself.

By the way how do we pronounce Gere in Richard Gere? I think it is pronounced as gray.
Jackson6612
to you we pronounce Pacino as pa-chee-no because we are approximating italian pronunciation. But why isn't Pacino just written as Pachino or Pacheeno because Pacino is misleading word as far as pronunciation is concerned? Perhaps Al Pacino chose these weird spellings for pa-chee-no himself to distinguish himself.

As far as I know, Pacino didn't chose his surname. It's an Italian surname, and we pronounce 'ci' as 'chee' in 'cheese' (a bit shorter, though).

Do you think it's weird? Why? Contrary to English, Italian has a phonetic pronunciation, with only few exceptions (such as 's' and 'z').

This means that, whenever you'll find 'ci' or 'cci' (as in 'cappuccino'), pronunciation will be the same as 'chee-(se)'... It's much easier, isn't it?

Scorsese is an Italian name, too. Italian e sounds like e in 'bed.' For the above reason, we pronounce the two e's in Scorsese the same way, while the two s's are different. So, if we have to "approximate Italian pronunciation," I disagree with both skOrsEze(I) and score-say-zee.

I'm not good at English phonetic symbols, so I can only say that maybe Marvin's one (skOrsEzE) could be a good transcription. I'm sure Yohf can give a more informative explanation!
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Pacino is not an odd spelling. It is an Italian, not English, name.

Gere is pronounced Geer to rhyme with beer and steer and mere.
TanitScorsese is an Italian name, too. Italian e sounds like e in 'bed.' For the above reason, we pronounce the two e's in Scorsese the same way, while the two s's are different. So, if we have to "approximate Italian pronunciation," I disagree with both skOrsEze(I) and score-say-zee.
It is normally pronounced skOrsEzi or "score-say-zee". I know that it is not the same as the Italian pronunciation, but that is how it is pronounced in English.
Alienvoord
TanitScorsese is an Italian name, too. Italian e sounds like e in 'bed.' For the above reason, we pronounce the two e's in Scorsese the same way, while the two s's are different. So, if we have to "approximate Italian pronunciation," I disagree with both skOrsEze(I) and score-say-zee.
It is normally pronounced skOrsEzi or "score-say-zee". I know that it is not the same as the Italian pronunciation, but that is how it is pronounced in English.
Hmm. That's a matter of opinion. That's not how I would say it in English. I would normally try to pronounce it as close as possible to the Italian, which would be [ skOrsEzE ] , but because English doesn't permit final [ E ] it would most likely usually come out as [ skOr\sEze(I) ] ; but if I wanted to pronounce it the Anglicized way, I would actually say [ skOr\siz ] rather than [ skor\sezi ] like you think it should be pronounced.
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AlienvoordIt is normally pronounced skOrsEzi or "score-say-zee". I know that it is not the same as the Italian pronunciation, but that is how it is pronounced in English.
Fair enough. Since he's American, you can decide how to pronounce his surname!

This reminds me of another thread, where some members discussed the way some foreign surnames are pronounced in English: http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/NonNativeAccents/2/dwdqn/Post.htm
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