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How to pronouce words like: jagged, legged, rugged, hard-earned. I hope I am being clear here. I hear some people say legged like they are stressing the "ed", while others just say legged w/o stressing on the "ed". please help.

Thanks
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It depends what comes before it.

Usually you emhasise the 'ed' sound when it follows a tt (trotted) or a g or gg (three-legged) but there are a few exceptions (lofts are lag'd not lagged).

If it is not following a tt or g or gg then it is very probably just a 'd sound.
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Hi, Eng!

I guess you meant "words endingin -ed"? Emotion: smile
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Jag-id, legg-id, rugg-id, hard-earn-d

Does that help?
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yes, words ending with 'ed'. Emotion: smile
How to pronounce words ending in "ed".

If the preceding sound is a t or a d, "ed" is pronounced id.
Else if the preceding sound is unvoiced (p, t, k, f, th, s, sh, ch), the "e" is silent and the "d" is pronounced t.
In all other cases, the "e" is silent and the "d" is pronounced d.

Exceptions:
The "ed" at the end of the following adjectives is pronounced id, contrary to the rules above. When used as verbs (if they can be), the normal rules apply.

jagged, ragged, cragged, legged, rugged, dogged, winged, naked, wicked, blessed, beloved *

The "ed" in "aged" is pronounced d when used as a verb or as an adjective to describe foods (aged cheese, aged beef, aged wine). It is pronounced id when it describes people (an aged man).

* If there are a few others, I'm sure other posters will contribute.

CJ