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* Relative pronoun : who, whom, whose, which, that* Relative adverb : when, where, why
Is 'how' neither a relative pronoun nor an relative adverb? Then, which category 'how' belong to?
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I would like to see the sentence in which "how" is used and is causing you concern.


The interrogative word "how" is not a relative element, but usually a subordinator in a dependent clause:

Do you know [how they opened the gate]?

The bracketed part is called an interrogative content/embeded clause in modern grammar ('noun clause' in traditional terminology), and functions as the complement of the verb "know".

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Sandip Kumar * Relative pronoun : who, whom, whose, which, that* Relative adverb : when, where, why
Is 'how' neither a relative pronoun nor an relative adverb? Then, which category 'how' belong to?

We answered this question in another thread.

https://www.englishforums.com/English/TheWayVsHow/bprrzp/post.htm


How can be an adverb or a subordinator (conjunction). Read the details on usage here:

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/how

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Noun clause is known as content clause in modern grammar. What are adjective clause and adverb clause in modern grammar? Just for learning!
The adjective clause is called "relative clause", also used conventionally, but adverbial clauses are known as adjuncts, e.g. conditional adjunct, concession adjunct, time adjunct, etc.
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I would like to see the sentence in which "how" is used and is causing you concern.


The interrogative word "how" is not a relative element, but usually a subordinator in a dependent clause:

Do you know [how they opened the gate]?

The bracketed part is called an interrogative content/embeded clause in modern grammar ('noun clause' in traditional terminology), and functions as the complement of the verb "know".

Is "complement" of a verb the same as the object of the verb? Why are you using the term 'complement' in place of 'object'?
Sandip KumarIs "complement" of a verb the same as the object of the verb?

No. In modern grammar, objects of the verb are complements, but other structures (chiefly clauses) are also classified as complements. So "direct object" and "indirect object" are special kinds of complements because they are noun phrases. Other complements are not called objects.

I know the truth. "the truth" is a noun phrase. It's a direct object, a type of complement of a verb. It's a complement of the verb "know".
I know that the earth is round. "that the earth is round" is not a noun phrase. It's not a direct object, but it is a clausal complement of the verb "know".

CJ

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In traditional grammar, complements are of two types only : Subjective complement and objective complement. But the types of complement (object or clause) don't fall into these two categories. Then, what are the types of complements in modern grammar?
Sandip Kumarwhat are the types of complements in modern grammar?

I don't know enough modern grammar to enumerate all the different constructions that can act as complements, but you might start at the link below and then use that website to find out more information about modern grammar.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/grammar/british-grammar/complements


I can't guarantee that that website will answer your question, so maybe I should give you at least a partial list.

1) After a linking verb a noun phrase or an adjective phrase can serve as a complement ("a subject complement").
2) After a direct object a noun phrase or an adjective phrase can serve as a complement ("an object complement").

(These first two are the same as in traditional grammar.)

Besides those, complements of a verb can be 1) an indirect object (which is a noun phrase), 2) a direct object (which is a noun phrase), 3) a preposition phrase or 4) a content clause. The content clause may be 4a) a declarative or 4b) an interrogative content clause.

Various non-finite clauses can also be complements.

There are probably others.

CJ

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