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Hello my friends

Can you tell me some tips for remembering new English vocabulary?

Thanks
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Comments  (Page 2) 
>There's a problem with English - it lacks imagery.

I'm not sure why say French, Russian or German would be any better in that respect.
There's a problem with English - it lacks imagery.
This is the first time I've ever heard this. Most people say that English is full of imagery, and especially useful, though subtle, imagery when it comes to many, many near-synonyms that are available to refine your way of expressing thoughts. Maybe it's a matter of becoming familiar with the imagery contained in the root syllables, much of which has been obscured through historical developments -- but it's there if you're willing to research it and "dig it out". Emotion: smile

As for the main question, the way to remember words is to use them as much as possible. Write a lot of example sentences using the new word. Have someone knowledgeable check them to be sure you are using the word correctly, or have them help you compose sentences which show the word in its most typical uses. Then try using it in your speech as well.

CJ
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CalifJimMaybe it's a matter of becoming familiar with the imagery contained in the root syllables, much of which has been obscured through historical developments -- but it's there if you're willing to research it and "dig it out". Emotion: smile
Exactly :-) Take sanskrit for example. I don't know much about it but I heard that it's full of stuff like that.
CalifJim...much of which has been obscured through historical developments-- but it's there if you're willing to research it and "dig it out". Emotion: smile
Actually these developments are being researched and there are already some controversial theories and archeological finds. There's a hypothesis you may hear for the first time. It claims that South Russia was the urheimat of Indo-European peoples . And it's supported by lots of interesting facts and theories. Such as that India has Vedas which were used by Aryans in The Ancient Russia before its christianization (after that lots of texts were destroyed and all resistants were executed), Vedas in the Middle East were destroyed by Alexander The Great. On the founded tombstone of ruler of Troy it says that its people should not forget its Holy Scripture - Vedas, because it's their power that holds them together as a nation. On the island Crete there have been found some very ancient stuff with lots of symbolic drawings. That stuff and writing(which was on the Phaistos Disk) definitely belongs to the Ancient Russian peoples. And it is the fact that Crete was the oldest civilization in Europe. The woman on a bull, called Europa is from Greek mythology but it amasingly resembles a woman from Slavic mythology. There were also lots of hypotesis about Etruscan civilization (which was on the territory of today's Italy)...

There are some words that actually have Russian roots. One of them is "calendar" which originally sounded as "Kolyady Dar" (I don't know how to write the last letter because there's no such vowel in English). "Kolyada" was an ancient god of Slavic people. "Dar" means "gift". So it means - "gift from Kolyada". It is mistakenly thought that this word is borrowed from the latin calendae.

So all of this and even more is being researched, and hopefully the truth will be dug out in the end :-)
I use google image as a dictionary
for lots of words, especially nouns, google image helps me to understand a word more quickly and easily than a dictionary does.
and also it helps me to remember a word longer
Try it out. I think it will work for you!
google image helps me to understand a word more quickly and easily than a dictionary does.
and also it helps me to remember a word longer
That is an excellent suggestion!!!

CJ
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