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If I'm speaking and I need to spell a dificult word and also want to add a diferent word to let the listener understand each letter so, should I say, "B" as in Buble, or "B" like in Buble.?
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Aviation and Military (NATO) Phonetic Alphabet:

A like Alfa B like Bravo C like Charlie D like Delta
E like Echo F like Foxtrot G like Golf H like Hotel
I like India J like Juliet K like Kilo L like Lima
M like Mike N like November O like Oscar P like Papa
Q like Quebec R like Romeo S like Sierra T like Tango
U like Uniform V like Victor W like Whisky X like X-Ray
Y like Yankee Z like Zulu

Is it what you want to know?

Or do you want to know the way to speak? If so, say "B like Bravo" or "B as Bravo".

paco
How should I say THIS?

If I'm speaking and I need to spell a dificult word and also want to add a diferent word to let the listener understand each letter so, should I say, "B" as in Buble, or "B" like in Buble.?

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I think that Guest just wanted to know how we say it, Paco, not what words to use.

Yes, Guest, we say, {letter} as in {word} OR {letter} like in {word}.

The first style would tend to be used in more formal circumstances, the latter is more casual.
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I say, without exception, "A as in ...", "B as in ...", and so on. I don't think I've ever heard it said any other way. I didn't realize anybody ever said it any differently.
please send me tang twiste like : how now brown cow
Anonymousplease send me tang twiste (tongue twisters) like : how now brown cow
Your question can be answered by clicking on this post in Puzzles and Riddles: Tongue twister
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CalifJimI say, without exception, "A as in ...", "B as in ...", and so on. I don't think I've ever heard it said any other way. I didn't realize anybody ever said it any differently.
I have always heard "a as in apple. I agree with Jim.
"Like" is generally a word I stay away from. (Y'know, like)

If you look it up it has a lot definitions, but in that particular context would be considered colloquial. The correct term would be
"as in".

I have heard it said, (and especially to young children) "B like Bag" with the person placing an emphisis with their lips on the B or C like Cat, again making the sound of a K.
First, you need to think about to whom are you going to be speaking? Is your listener familiar with these terms, i.e., "as in" or "like in?" Perhaps, you should make some initial references to these terms, so as to set the stage for your explanation.
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