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How can i easily differentiate between a transitive and an intransitive verb? Are there any set of rule that set them apart or is it solely based upon the context of the sentence?

GB
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Grammarian-botHow can i easily differentiate between a transitive and an intransitive verb? Are there any set of rule that set them apart or is it solely based upon the context of the sentence?

GB

A transitive verb has a direct object. Without examples, it is difficult to explain the difference.

"I ate" = intransitive. "I ate my dinner" = transitive, 'dinner' being the direct object.
There are transitive verbs, intransitive ones, and there are verbs that are of both types.

I play very well. Intransitive, because there is no object attached to the verb.
I play football. football is the direct object of the verb, thus 'play' here is transitive.
I like you. 'you' is the object.
I fell off the three. The highlighted part is an advebial phrase, 'off' is the adverbial particle. "fall" here takes no object.

Transitive verbs take an object, intransitives do not.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
<I fell off the three. The highlighted part is an advebial phrase, 'off' is the adverbial particle. "fall" here takes no object.>

Would "three" be a typo there?
No, I did not know the correct spelling
I started learning English from scratch, without any previous knowledge, three years ago.
I have never met any English teacher, only books and net.
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It's "tree". Do you pronounce it as "three"?
Milky, please, get off my back.
Thanks.
I'm not on your back. I was interested in knowing how you pronounce the word "tree". Many of my Spanish speaking students pronounce it as "three" in English. Often, they spell it that way too.
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