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SimplyblessedwithloveCould we please use yours, Mr. P? Emotion: wink

Suddenly I feel I'm waiting in a draughty corridor in one of those smock things the hospital gives you to wear while you're waiting to have something very uncomfortable done to you which involves unspeakable instruments and rubber gloves.

Emotion: tongue tied

But no, of course I don't mind. As long as I don't have to watch. And as long as I can keep my hat on.

MrP
MrPedantic
Simplyblessedwithlove
Could we please use yours, Mr. P? Emotion: wink

Suddenly I feel I'm waiting in a draughty corridor in one of those smock things the hospital gives you to wear while you're waiting to have something very uncomfortable done to you which involves unspeakable instruments and rubber gloves.

Emotion: tongue tied

But no, of course I don't mind. As long as I don't have to watch. And as long as I can keep my hat on.

MrP

Thank you so much. And LOL this bold part is so native's. I could totally picture what you're talking about. Englishuser will have a hard time to find something to compare to this. Emotion: wink
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
SimplyblessedwithloveEnglishuser will have a hard time to find something to compare to this.

(Given the state of English hospitals, I sincerely hope so.)
Hi simplyblessedwithlove,

Why do you think the text is written by a non-native?

Englishuser
Hi, everytbody, I am Spanish native speaker, and I am able to speak fluently my language. But people who grew up in a home where language is not than english language is not a native speaker. For example, the non-native does not speak fluently, the accent is stress and translates the ideas from Spanish to English. I consider we speak English well but not as a native speaker English language.

Mr. OpEmotion: big smile
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Here is a link to a short article about a scientist who has analysed language use on the internet. http://www.cnet.com.au/software/internet/0,239029524,339271420,00.htm .

As part of this, he believes that he can often tell where the writer originates.

An excerpt:

"By analysing text, Dr Krawetz can also learn something of a person's nationality. For example, when analysing multiple documents, patterns emerge in word choice, punctuation and sentence length. Americans choose words from a small core vocabulary, while Europeans draw from a much larger vocabulary and use alternative spelling choices to some equivalent American English words. Australians are a hybrid, using a smaller core vocabulary but choosing European spellings. Shorter sentences with simple punctuation are more likely to be American, and longer sentences with complex punctuation are more likely to be European."
MrPedanticHello EU

1. I think Scandinavian, Dutch and German natives have the best chance of sounding convincingly "British English". I have several such people in mind whose original accents are very hard to detect, and whose spoken English is almost perfectly idiomatic;

MrP
You forgot the Belgian ones Emotion: crying
I agree, non-native. I know it's been three years but could you please tell us the right answer?!

Cheers Emotion: smile
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Very obviously a "native speaker" (whatever that may actually mean). That doesn't preclude a Nabokov or Conrad of course. So to be more accurate, definitely not a "non-native speaker", no giveaway stylistic tics, odd choices of idiom, register ... Highly unlikely to be an American by birth. Given the content, probably a UK academic although conceivably an old-school journalist.
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