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Hi, I wanted to say something like this. What is the difference between the three sentences?

They are the same? Which one is more natural way of saying that?


When it had been two weeks since I came to the UK, I didn’t know how to use the vending machine.

It was my second week since I came to the UK, I didn’t know how to use the vending machine.

in the first two weeks that I came to the UK, I didn’t know how to use the vending machine.

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Here are some ways to say that:

It was two weeks after I arrived in the UK, and I still didn't know how to use a vending machine.

I was two weeks into my stay in the UK, but I still didn't know how to use a vending machine.

Despite having been in the UK for two weeks, I still hadn't learned how to use a vending machine.

Although I had already been in the UK for two weeks, I still hadn't learned how vending machines work.

Even after being in the UK for two weeks, I didn't know anything about using vending machines.

CJ

Comments  
soeun sonWhen it had been two weeks since I came to the UK, I didn’t know how to use the vending machine.

This is clear enough, but the wording is odd.

soeun sonIt was my second week since I came to the UK, I didn’t know how to use the vending machine.

That is a comma splice. Again, it would be understood, but it is broken English.

soeun sonin the first two weeks that I came to the UK, I didn’t know how to use the vending machine.

"In … that" does not work.

Try "For the first two weeks after I came to the UK, I didn't know how to use the vending machines."

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.