+0

Hi!I need just a little help to finish a formal letter. I have to write a business letter but I'm not sure how to end it with a formal greeting.

I've found several choices:

  1. I am looking forward to hearing you
  2. I am looking forward to meeting you
  3. Thanks in advance
  4. Sincerely yours.

I could guess the first two of them mean that I'm waiting any kind of response, but I wonder if I can combine some of them or perhaps it is just allowed to use only one of them.

Thanks in advance
jsalruiz77

P.D. By the way, do the two following sentences have the same meaning?

  1. It is suppose that I have to write a letter
  2. I'm supposed to write a letter.
+2

When you use Dear Sir, Dear Madam go for the slightly more formal:

Yours faithfully,
or
Regards,

More familiar forms of address like Sincerely yours, Yours sincerely can be used when the name is known e.g. Miss Smith in the letterhead.

Though Regards is becoming more and more popular.

+1
Hi,

What of ending the letter simply with: Yours, "Name". This is not formal.

For a formal letter, 99% of the time you can just use 'Yours sincerely'.

Best wishes, Clive
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+0

If you know the name of the person you are addressing, you started the letter Dear Mr... then you should end the letter with Yours sincerely,...

If you do not know the letter of the person you are addressing, if you started the letter Dear Sir or Madam or To Whom It May Concern, you should end the letter with Yours Faithfully or Yours Truly.

It is possible to end with:

Looking forward to hearing from you,
Yours sincerely (or faithfully or truly),
[your name and signature]

"I´ve found several choices:
a) I am looking forward to hearing you
b) I am looking forward to meeting you

Firstly - it is best to drop the personal pronoun "I" from this sentence in a formal letter and simply to use the construction shown above "Looking forward" instead of "I am looking forward"

  1. This is not correct - it is missing from
  2. Correct. Can be used if you are certain you will be meeting the addressee (e.g. if it is an RSVP or something)
  3. It is not formal. A more formal construction of this sentence would be 'Thank you in advance'
  4. The word order should be switched - 'Yours sincerely' not 'Sincerely yours.'
response to P.D. - the sentence "It is suppose that I have to write a letter" is incorrect, the second is correct.

Hope this helps.

1 2 3
Comments  
Hi,

Thanks, looking forward to hearing from you.

The proper close for a business letter is:

Yours faithfully,
Yours sincerely

"Thank you" is not correct as a close. Write it, if you wish, at the end of your message.

Hope this helps!
hadeka
Hi,

I looked over my letters and:

you can combine some of them as closing sentence and complimentary close.

Ex:

I look forward to hearing from you and in the meantime, should you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Yours truly,
hadeka

Have a good day!
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I would be grateful if you would tell me what a bussines letter should include.
 anonymous's reply was promoted to an answer.
Why not write

Best regards,

?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
a) I am looking forward to hearing FROM you
b) I am looking forward to meeting you
c)Thank You,
d)Sincerely,
e) Thank you for your time,

a) It is suppose that I have to write a letter (not correct.
I have to write a letter.
I am supposed to write a letter.

b)I'm supposed to write a letter. (This is pretty informal)

I would say:

I am writing you to ask
or
I am writing because I am interested in...
What of ending the letter simply with: Yours, "Name".
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
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