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Hi, all

I'd like to ask you how would you pronounce the phrase printed in bold:

I would not let that happent that's what I'd do.

[aid do] or [ai do]

Thanks.
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Hi,

I'd like to ask you how would you pronounce the phrase printed in bold:

I would not let that happent that's what I'd do.

[aid do] or [ai do]

Say it as [aid do].

Best wishes, Clive
Hi, Clive

Thanks for your advice, but do native speakers always pronounce I'd do as [aid do]?
I've heard a few times, especially then people speak very fast, it sounds like [ai do], though I may be wrong.

ND
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Hi,

It's true that speed will make the two 'd' sounds start to blend together. But only if you are speaking very, very fast.

Best wishes, Clive
By enclosing a phonetic transcription in square brackets, you are saying that it is in IPA or XSAMPA. What you transcribed would sound like "eed dow". "I'd do" is actually [ aId_} du ] . The first /d/ is pronounced as an unreleased [ d_} ] : you block off the flow of air like you are going to say a [ d ] , but it is not actually [ d ] but rather [ d_} ] .
Hi,
I think it's...

eyed do

..and you are right, there's only one D sound, but it's still different from "eye do". This happens very often when there's a word that ends with a sound similar to the first of the following word. So, when you have two similar sounds, you don't pronounce both of them completely, but you join them together. In the case of "eyed do", you should "hold" the first D (put the tongue where it goes for a D sound, but don't release the sound), and release the sound (= you actually do it completely) when you pronounce the second D. ----> eye(d)-do
If you make both sounds, it'll sound like "eye duh do", and that's not what you hear from natives <--- but Italians do that, LOL
Note that "eye(d)-do" is not the same as "eye do". It is true that you don't hear two D's in the former, but there's a kind of "pause" or "stop" due to the unreleased D that makes it different from the latter.

That's the way I see it Emotion: smile
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Anonymous_8:03 PM and Kooyeen, that's exactly what I meant. You both very clearly described the way of pronouncing it. I'm just not really good at transcription Emotion: wink. But If we look at this from the perspective of a listener, I think it's quite hard, at least for me, to distinguish between these two, especially then natives speak very fast.

ND
Kooyeen,

Aren't there words in Italian with double d? (e.g., raddoppio)
And wouldn't they be said the same as the double d in I'd do?

Jim
CalifJim Aren't there words in Italian with double d? (e.g., raddoppio)
And wouldn't they be said the same as the double d in I'd do?
Whoa! Yes! Amazing! I'd never thought about that, really. I can speak Italian, but I don't know how I am able to do so! I'd never thought how to pronounce a double consonant in Italian... Very interesting... Emotion: smile
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